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me_in_paris_198That’s me, on a trip,  sitting in a Paris restaurant.
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You may have heard about this woman, Marina Chapman . . . she was kidnapped at about age 4 in Columbia. She was eventually discarded in the jungle. This, just a few days after her capture. No humans. No help. She learned to survive in the jungle and was taken in by a large Capuchin monkey family. She had no language, much, except sounds she learned amongst the monkeys. She lived for some years in the jungle, all alone. Eventually she saw some humans and followed them, was made a slave. Terribly treated, nearly starved, and was being primed as a prostitute, but she escaped that too. Her story is harrowing, and yet uplifting. She did escape eventually, in her mid-teens and grew up from there with a kind, loving family in Bogota. Her adult daughter helped her to write the stories – most of which she wanted to forget. The book is The Girl With No Name: The Incredible Story of a Child Raised by Monkeys by Marina Chapman and Lynne Barrett-Lee. National Geographic highlighted her story awhile back, and she appeared on some morning TV shows when the book came out in 2014. The author is writing a sequel, about Chapman’s life after she was rescued. I’ll be watching for that as this book leaves you hanging – only knowing that she was rescued and went to Bogota.

Just finished reading a very unusual book, certainly not on everyone’s radar – Once an Arafat Man: The True Story of How a PLO Sniper Found a New Life by Tass Saada. It’s about an angry young Palestinian. He felt wronged; he felt despised; his father didn’t understand him. He escaped his family’s plan for his life and became a PLO sniper. He killed many people. He killed Israelis and was elated. He was sent to the United States and big plans were in store for him, he thought. And then he discovered a new life as a Christian. It didn’t happen overnight, and he had many questions along the way. His family disowned him, yet he persevered. He met an American woman, married her, and had children. And he became an activist for change. It’s a fascinating story. He now speaks around the world, for peace and understanding about the Palestinian problem(s). It’s quite a book, and I’m glad I read it.

A publisher contacted me recently and asked if I’d like a copy of a new book called Book Cover Designs by Matthew Goodman. This might not be a book up everyone’s alley, but it certainly was mine. Since my career was in advertising, and graphic design, fonts and writing play important parts in that biz, I was very interested in reading the dozens of brief stories of many of today’s top book cover designers. It’s all about how they create and develop book covers that sell, or that give a tiny glimpse into the content of a book. This was as much about non-fiction books as fictional ones, and as you might expect, the designers obviously read or certainly heavily scan every book to find its core, and they go from there with the use of color, graphic art, photographs, and FONTS. I was interested in the use of fonts (I love different type fonts and am very limited here on my blog, unfortunately) and how they decided to use a specific one or more than one. Each chapter, about a specific designer, has a photo of the person, a brief background and then from their own words, how they come about the design of a cover. Then there are anywhere from 8-12 or so examples from that designer. VERY interesting book. If you have someone who has a design interest, is in the book biz, or graphic design, any of those, this would make a nice gift, I think. I really enjoyed reading all the stories and then examining each cover design they included.

Just finished reading a very unusual book, A Man Called Ove: A Novel by Frederich Bachman. Simply put, it’s a story about a curmudgeon. In fact, I think that word is used in one of the first sentences of the book. Ove, is a newly retired (unwillingly) Swedish man in his late 50s. He’s a stickler for the rules, things being “just so,” and most likely is a fictional example of OCD and the proverbial glass is half empty version of life. But OCD is never mentioned in the book. It takes awhile to figure out the story about his beloved wife, but it’s about his frustration in life in general, and about the relationships (or not) with his neighbors. It’s SUCH a sweet story if you can get over poor Ove and his over-the-top reactions to just about everything. I haven’t laughed out loud reading a book in a long time, but I did with this one. If you read it, don’t get discouraged in the early part – keep reading. When we discussed this at my book club, we re-lived some of the outrageously funny scenes from the book, and laughed again. And again.

 

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Breads, Uncategorized, on October 21st, 2009.

raised pumpkin bread slicedWe don’t eat a lot of bread at our house – generally a half a slice each for breakfast. Once in awhile we’ll have a sandwich, but believe it or not, most bread gets moldy before we use it up. We freeze bread some, but I’m never very happy with it after it’s been in the freezer for more than 4-5 days. I wrap it in foil, then in a freezer plastic bag and still the edges seem to dry out. A few months ago we had just started using what we could, stored at room temp and throwing it out once it got moldy. But I was tired of the grainy, seedy bread we’d been having.

pumpkin bread yeast Since it’s Fall, I dug out my tried and true pumpkin yeast bread recipe and one day when I was home, and I made bread. Normally when you think of pumpkin bread, you likely think of a sweet quick bread. This is not that kind. This is a perfect sandwich or toasting bread. It’s NOT sweet, although it does have a little bit of sugar in it. It’s a soft bread – I use 3/4 white bread flour and 1/4 whole wheat flour. Our normal half-slice portion at breakfast has been upped to a whole slice each. It’s so nice with a little bit of butter. Here you can see the loaves just out of the oven.

If you’ve not been reading my blog for a long time, you may not know that I used to bake a whole lot of bread. When I was a young mom, trying to make some money, for a lunch out, for a babysitter now and then. I had a very small but thriving business, of sorts, baking bread once a week that I sold to friends and family. I was a stay-at-home mom, and enjoyed the process of making bread. I had a menu of about 10 varieties I made, including Stollen at Christmastime. And this bread wasn’t on the menu because I hadn’t discovered it yet.

raised pumpkin bread slice Years later, when I was working full-time, I invested in one of the first bread machines, and we enjoyed loaf after loaf when our kids were teenagers. This recipe is one that I adapted from one of the bread machine cookbooks. But I’ve found that it works best to make it by hand. Well, you can mix it in the machine for the first round, but let it rise in bread pans for the second rising. It will become a beautiful tall loaf, worthy of the finest toasters or turkey sandwiches. This time I kneaded it in the Kitchen Aid mixer with the dough hook, and did the 2nd time by hand, kneading in the raisins and nuts as I worked.

This isn’t a new recipe to my blog – I posted it first a year ago. Although I’ve been making this bread a couple times a year for about 25 years. It’s absolutely the BEST with Thanksgiving turkey leftovers in a sandwich. Don’t be intimidated by making yeast bread – as long as you have a few hours when you can tend to the bread a couple of times, this is a pretty foolproof recipe. I’ve never had it fail. If you want, add different fruit (dried apricots, craisins) or nuts (pecans). Or eliminate one or the other if you don’t have them on hand.
Click here to get to the recipe.

I’ve submitted this recipe to Yeastspotting.

A year ago: Pear Crisp (ooh, was that ever good!)
Two years ago: Twice Baked Cauliflower Take Two

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  1. Susan/Wild Yeast

    said on November 12th, 2009:

    This looks fabulous! I can imagine it with toasted pumpkin seeds also. Thank you for joining YeastSpotting!

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