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On my recent trip, I managed to get in a lot of reading on my Kindle. On airplanes, waiting for airplanes, waiting for the bus to load, waiting in lobbies for everybody to show up to leave, and at night when I couldn’t sleep. A fun book was Mr. Mac and Me, by Esther Freud. It takes place in England in 1914. In a time and place where a 13-year old boy has a lot of freedom. Although the war is looming, this little village is relatively quiet and safe, as life used to be. Boys will be boys, and he enjoys sort-of spying on people, especially people he doesn’t know well. He imagines that a man who arrives in town to rent a house with his paints and easels, might be a spy. Thus begins a story that starts from that premise, but eventually takes you into a very special friendship that develops between the man, Mr. Mac, his wife, and this boy. The story is absolutely charming. War brings some brutal truths for everyone in the village, yet this friendship flourishes. Great book.

Occasionally I’ll latch onto a book about food or restaurants. This one, The Lost Recipe for Happiness by Barbara O’Neal, is a romance (not a sticky sweet one) about a youngish woman (and her dog) who take a big leap to Colorado when she’s offered a job as a chef. The restaurant is fraught with some issues, but the author weaves in a romance, her skills as a leader in the kitchen, throws in some recipes (that I have yet to extract from my Kindle pages, that I want to try) along with it, and you have a book that held my interest all the way through. Formulaic, I suppose, but it’s a cute story. Books about restaurants always divulge some new tangle of how a kitchen runs. I enjoyed the read.

If you haven’t already read it, you are missing a really good and insightful book, Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan by Bill O’Reilly. I was riveted from page one, all the way through to the end. O’Reilly has a very engaging way of re-telling history and making it ever-so readable and interesting. He weaves people’s stories, ones  you likely haven’t read or heard, into his narrative, to give you such a sense of place. You can just feel how these soldiers, pilots, prisoners and seamen made their mark, but likely all unsung heroes. It’s a must-read, it really is.

Having read some of Kent Haruf’s other books, I read Our Souls at Night. A lonely widow decides to invite a neighbor man, also a lonely widower, if he’d like to come to her home, at night, to spend the night. I simply can’t tell you anything else because it would give away the story. This isn’t a story about s-x, but about two lonely people who come together for friendship and companionship. It’s very sweet, not twee, but sweet. You really feel for both of these older people. Read it.

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Desserts, on September 1st, 2016.

choc_buttermilk_cinn_cake

Oh my goodness, this was so delicious. The tenderest cake you can imagine, with a simple boiled frosting that’s spread on the hot cake, right out of the oven.

Having been invited to a fairly large backyard barbecue get-together, my friend Cherrie asked me to bring dessert. Knowing they were expecting close to 40 people, I knew I needed to make something to serve a lot of people (although, others brought dessert too). I’d wavered between making a lemon bundt cake, or a butterscotch poke cake, or a rum cake, but finally settled on this one. A recipe I’d never made before, but it had gotten raves (according to my notes) on some website. I have no idea where it came from.

What I will tell you, though, is that you need to have a pan that’s not all that common in most kitchens – it’s a 10×15 pan, rimmed. I think mine is 1 1/2” high on the sides. If  you do a Google search for 10×15 jelly roll pan, you’ll find numerous sources for that size. It’s bigger than a quarter sheet pan, and it’s larger than a 9×13 also. I do have a number of recipes for this particular pan (not  jelly roll cakes!) and am glad I have it. Most of these pans don’t have very high sides, but this cake does need at least a 1” side or it would overflow.

choc_buttermilk_cinn_cake_inpanAnyway, It’s a very regular cake – this one made with cocoa (I used Hershey’s dark, a favorite), oil, eggs, butter, buttermilk (which gives it that oh-so tender crumb) and a fairly healthy dose of ground cinnamon. While the cake is baking – toward the end of the 20-minute cooking time I mixed up the frosting (on the stovetop) – it also uses cocoa, a little bit of whipping cream, butter, powdered sugar and nuts. It’s very easy to make – there isn’t anything fussy about it. It’s not a liquid, but it’s not really stiff, either. There is JUST enough of the frosting to delicately spread (use an offset spatula if you have one) the frosting over the top of the hot cake. I suggest putting a bunch of little dollops of the frosting all over the cake so it’s easier to spread it out. Getting out to the corners is the hardest, if you can call it “hard.” You can add the nuts to the frosting (I did, so they’d definitely stay put) or you can sprinkle the nuts on top after spreading the frosting and just press them into the frosting a bit). I used walnuts, but pecans are an optional nut.

Having made this, I THINK this is a riff on a Texas sheet cake. I’ve never made one of those, but I suspect that’s what this is, but with the buttermilk it makes it so tender.

Well, rather than go on and on about it – just move to the next paragraph and read the results!

What’s GOOD: The cake got raves. Absolutely raves. Me included. Some friends from San Diego who were invited to the party came to stay with me – they had to sample the cake before we even left my house! SO, I did too. It’s a fabulous cake – very chocolaty, very tender, but cut into lots of small bar-shapes, each piece was about 2-3 bites at most. I’m sorry there weren’t leftovers to bring home. I’d love-me one of those right now! The cinnamon is very THERE – if you don’t like cinnamon, just leave it out, or reduce it significantly in both cake and frosting. I loved the cinnamon flavor – such a complement to the chocolate.

What’s NOT: nary a thing except you’ll have sticky chocolate frosting fingers unless you eat it with a fork! This recipe is a keeper, for sure.

printer-friendly PDF and MasterCook 15/16 file (click link to open recipe)

* Exported from MasterCook *

Cinnamon Chocolate Cake

Recipe By: Am not sure the origin of my recipe – but it’s available online at Taste of Home
Serving Size: 30

2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup water
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup butter — cubed
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa — [I used Hershey’s dark]
2 eggs
1/2 cup buttermilk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon baking soda
FROSTING:
1/2 cup butter — cubed
1/3 cup heavy whipping cream
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
3 cups confectioners’ sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup walnuts — or pecans finely chopped

NOTES: You can triple this recipe and make it in two large-large 11x17x1 pans, but increase baking time by 5-7 minutes.
1. In a mixing bowl, combine the first four ingredients. In a saucepan, combine the water, oil, butter and cocoa; bring just to a boil over medium heat. Pour over dry ingredients; mix well. Add eggs, buttermilk, vanilla and baking soda; mix well. Pour into a greased 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pan.
2. Bake at 375° for 15-20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Place on a wire rack.
3. Meanwhile, during the last 10 minutes of baking, prepare FROSTING: combine the butter, cream, cocoa and cinnamon in a saucepan. Cook and stir over medium heat until butter is melted and mixture is heated through. Remove from the heat; beat in sugar and vanilla until smooth. Stir in walnuts. Carefully and gently scoop about 6 big dollops of the frosting on the cake, then using an offset spatula, spread over warm cake, all the way out to the corners. If the frosting is hot, it will spread easily enough. Cool completely. Yield: 24-30 small bar-shaped servings. Note: You may also sprinkle the nuts on top after spreading the frosting – your choice.
Per Serving: 263 Calories; 14g Fat (45.9% calories from fat); 3g Protein; 33g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 34mg Cholesterol; 134mg Sodium.

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  1. Leslie Christon

    said on September 2nd, 2016:

    On your recommendation, I read Plainsong by Kent Haruf, and then the two related books, Eventide and Benediction. Talk about plucking your heartstrings! Well worth the read, thank you for bringing these to my attention! Not very often do I find both excellent recipes as well as book selections I know I’ll enjoy. I love your posts, and have passed them on to friends and family. Thank you so much.

    Warm regards,
    Leslie

    How very sweet of you, Leslie. Thank you for telling me. I do wonder, sometimes, whether anybody actually reads my blog since I have very few people who ever leave comments. So I doubly appreciate your kind words, and glad you enjoyed Haruf’s books. Just heard about a book today called “Evergreen.” Don’t know anything about it, except that it brought tears at the end. . . .carolyn t

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