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me_in_paris_198That’s me, on a trip, in a Paris restaurant.
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On my recent trip, I managed to get in a lot of reading on my Kindle. On airplanes, waiting for airplanes, waiting for the bus to load, waiting in lobbies for everybody to show up to leave, and at night when I couldn’t sleep. A fun book was Mr. Mac and Me, by Esther Freud. It takes place in England in 1914. In a time and place where a 13-year old boy has a lot of freedom. Although the war is looming, this little village is relatively quiet and safe, as life used to be. Boys will be boys, and he enjoys sort-of spying on people, especially people he doesn’t know well. He imagines that a man who arrives in town to rent a house with his paints and easels, might be a spy. Thus begins a story that starts from that premise, but eventually takes you into a very special friendship that develops between the man, Mr. Mac, his wife, and this boy. The story is absolutely charming. War brings some brutal truths for everyone in the village, yet this friendship flourishes. Great book.

Occasionally I’ll latch onto a book about food or restaurants. This one, The Lost Recipe for Happiness by Barbara O’Neal, is a romance (not a sticky sweet one) about a youngish woman (and her dog) who take a big leap to Colorado when she’s offered a job as a chef. The restaurant is fraught with some issues, but the author weaves in a romance, her skills as a leader in the kitchen, throws in some recipes (that I have yet to extract from my Kindle pages, that I want to try) along with it, and you have a book that held my interest all the way through. Formulaic, I suppose, but it’s a cute story. Books about restaurants always divulge some new tangle of how a kitchen runs. I enjoyed the read.

If you haven’t already read it, you are missing a really good and insightful book, Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan by Bill O’Reilly. I was riveted from page one, all the way through to the end. O’Reilly has a very engaging way of re-telling history and making it ever-so readable and interesting. He weaves people’s stories, ones  you likely haven’t read or heard, into his narrative, to give you such a sense of place. You can just feel how these soldiers, pilots, prisoners and seamen made their mark, but likely all unsung heroes. It’s a must-read, it really is.

Having read some of Kent Haruf’s other books, I read Our Souls at Night. A lonely widow decides to invite a neighbor man, also a lonely widower, if he’d like to come to her home, at night, to spend the night. I simply can’t tell you anything else because it would give away the story. This isn’t a story about s-x, but about two lonely people who come together for friendship and companionship. It’s very sweet, not twee, but sweet. You really feel for both of these older people. Read it.

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Sous Vide, on December 10th, 2012.


You really don’t need a SousVide Supreme Water Oven in order to make this salmon dish. It’s just poached salmon,  served with an easy dill sour cream-mayo sauce on top.

My Sous Vide Water Oven was sitting out on the kitchen counter already, so I decided to defrost some salmon I’d packaged some weeks ago when I saw some really nice wild salmon at Costco. I’d cut it up into serving pieces, put two to a pouch in my FoodSaver vacuum pouches and they went into the freezer. The only thing I’d done was sprinkle them with fresh dill, salt and pepper and placed a small pat of butter in on top of the fillets. I defrosted the salmon, slipped it into 140° water and let it sit for 30 minutes. Normally sous vide recipes indicate 40 minutes, but the fillets were thinner than anticipated, so I only did 30 minutes. When I peeked inside the water oven the collagen had begun to whiten (meaning it’s almost over-done) so I took them out immediately.


There you can see the pouches. When I created the collage, they got reversed – sorry – the bottom one shows the two raw salmon fillets with salt, pepper and dill in it. The upper one was taken just after I removed it from the sous vide. The white stuff is the collagen which has leaked out of the salmon flesh.

Whenever my DH grills, and we used to grill salmon a lot, big slabs of it, I’d make a kind of foil “dish” by turning the edges up a little bit, but leaving the top open. And as soon as he would see the white begin to show on the top of the salmon, it was DONE.

Using the sous vide, I just kept watching it as it sat under water and the collagen was appearing at 20 minutes, but at 30 it was almost too much. Next time I’ll peek at 25 minutes. It all depends on how thick the salmon fillets are . . .

Meanwhile, during that 30 minute period I’d whipped up the sauce. It was cinchy easy – near to equal parts (low-fat) sour cream and mayo, some lemon juice and more fresh dill. I smeared a bit on each piece as it was served. Do use a heated platter, or heated dinner plates as the salmon is only at 140°. Perfect for eating, but it won’t hold the heat for very long. If you prefer to have hot-hot temp salmon, you could heat pieces in the microwave, or lightly (and quickly) sauté them in a little oil/butter until they sizzle and serve.

What I liked: how really easy this dinner was to put together. You could probably serve this without any sauce on top, but both my DH and I get bored with just a piece of meat or fish with nothing at all on it, or to dip it into. So this sauce was easy to stir up in a matter of minutes. Salmon and dill just have a wonderful affinity for one another.
What I didn’t like: nothing, really.

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Fillet of Salmon with Dill Sauce Sous Vide 140°

Recipe By: My own concoction
Serving Size: 4
NOTES: The wild salmon I had was about 3/4 inch thick, so I adjusted the cooking time to 30 minutes. If yours are thicker than that, increase time by 10-15 minutes. If you have hearty eaters, you can certainly increase the size of the salmon fillets and cook them just a bit longer.

16 ounces salmon fillets — (4)
8 teaspoons unsalted butter
2 teaspoons fresh dill
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/3 cup light sour cream
3 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise
1 teaspoon fresh dill
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons Italian parsley — minced

1. Pat dry the salmon pieces. Sprinkle lightly with fresh dill, salt and pepper. Place them (individually or two to a pouch) in a vacuum sealing type bag. Add 2 tsp. butter on top of each piece of salmon. Seal bags with a vacuum sealer. Refrigerate until ready to cook. Or, you can freeze the bags at this point and defrost when you’re prepared to cook them.
2. Preheat the sous vide water oven to 140°.
3. Place salmon pouches in the sous vide (in a rack or weight them so they stay under water at all times).Cook for 30 minutes.
4. DILL SAUCE: Meanwhile, prepare the sauce – combine in a small bowl the sour cream, mayo, dill and lemon juice. Add salt and pepper to taste. Refrigerate until serving time.
5. Remove pouches from the sous vide, open them and place on a heated platter or individual heated plates. Nap the tops of each salmon filet with some of the dill sauce and serve immediately. Add some minced parsley to the top, if desired.
Per Serving: 237 Calories; 15g Fat (57.5% calories from fat); 23g Protein; 2g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 85mg Cholesterol; 136mg Sodium.

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