Get updates sent to you for free by RSS, or by email:


Currently Reading

me_in_paris_198That’s me, on a trip,  sitting in a Paris restaurant.
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Just finished reading Me Before You by Jojo Moyes. Oh my goodness. When one of my book groups met to discuss this book, we all talked about the crying we did at the end. Oh yes, me too. This is a novel with a point to make (somewhat like Jodi Piccoult’s books). In this case it’s the right to die issue and it’s cloaked in a fast-paced page turner. A young woman who is a bit at loose ends, accepts a new job as a caregiver, something she’s never done before, to a young man who had recently become a quadriplegic. There are numerous sub-stories (about her family, her relationship with her sister, her boyfriend and her relationship with him, the patient himself, who is grumpy, and his relationships with his mother and father and ex-girlfriend). And, it’s about his wish to end his life. During the last 100 pages I could hardly put it down. I don’t want to jinx the story. It’s a romance of sorts. It’s gritty in a way, but charming. Loved the book. Now I’m going to order the sequel, the book the author never really intended to write, but so many people wrote her asking for one. I’m right there too. This book is being made into a movie.

Also read A Year on Ladybug Farm by Donna Ball. It’s a selection from one of my book clubs. An easy – very easy – read. Not a deep book by any means. It’s a story about 3 middle-aged women who decide to buy an old ram shackled house (maybe mansion) in the South and devote a year to fixing it up. There are many twists and turns with numerous people (a ghost, a vagrant, a handyman, and many neighbors) entering into the story. Much calamity ensues with house repairs and all 3 women questioning their sanity when they bought the place – Ladybug Farm. It’s cute. No swear words. No sex. Just a very pleasant story about friendship and an old house.

Probably the most in-depth book I’ve read recently is Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World by Jack Weatherford. If you decide you want to read this, make sure you get THIS one by Weatherford – there are many books out there with “Genghis Khan” in the title. What I knew about Genghis Khan before I started reading this book could be put into a very small thimble. We’ve heard the descriptions of his viciousness and slaughter of thousands of people. Well, what you learn is that that kind of behavior was typical of the warring tribes of the time. His story was fascinating. Believe it or not, I found the book a page-turner. Weatherford has a gift for writing a good story – it reads more like a novel, but it’s a biography, an easily read one. The last third of the book is more about his son who took over the kingdom after his father’s death, and it’s every bit as interesting. A definite good read – and makes for interesting talk around the water cooler.

Oh, I can’t forget another monumental tome, The Accidental Empress: A Novel by Pataki. It’s about the Austro-Hungarian Empress and wife of Emperor Franz Joseph. From amazon: The year is 1853, and the Habsburgs are Europe’s most powerful ruling family. With his empire stretching from Austria to Russia, from Germany to Italy, Emperor Franz Joseph is young, rich, and ready to marry. And he marries Sisi, a little known 15-year old. The book is her story. If you enjoy historical fiction, this is a good one. Loved it.

Another good read: The High Divide: A Novel by Lin Enger. Takes place in the late 1800s in remote Minnesota. It tells the story of a young family, husband, wife, and 2 sons. The husband, without work, suddenly leaves his family with no explanation. The wife is left back at the homestead with her 2 sons with next to nothing to carry them through. The 2 young boys decide they have to go in search of their father, and very ill-equipped to do so. Then the mother also heads out to find her boys. She believes her husband left with good intentions, but she doesn’t know. You do learn a bit about the husband eventually. Made for a very riveting story if you enjoy that time in history, with a complex family relationship that is tested by the weather, the moral codes of the time, and by the meaning of family. Good story.

Another fascinating book I just finished is Three Daughters: A Novel by Baehr. It covers a part of the world and time that I’ve never encountered in my reading of fiction. From amazon: From the fertile hills of a tiny village near Jerusalem to the elegant townhouses of Georgetown, Three Daughters is a historical saga that chronicles the lives, loves, and secrets of three generations of Palestinian Christian women. It begins around 1900, near Jerusalem. There are a whole lot of family secrets that play parts in this book (adultery mostly) that certainly makes for an interesting read. If you overlook the immorality involved (which continues, in secret through the generations) you’ll find the story quite riveting. It’s a HUGE book, though, so don’t go further if that overwhelms you. It didn’t bother me a bit as I could hardly put it down.

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small engraved sterling silver tea spoons that I use to taste as I'm cooking.

Scroll down to the bottom to view my Blogroll

Posted in Desserts, on November 11th, 2009.

chocolate souffle_2

Don’t you just want to grab a spoon and scrape up that drip and move it directly into your mouth? Because the soufflé top was tilting the way it did, I couldn’t photograph the top without viewing the drip. So, drip it is. Does it make it more real?

I mentioned last week that I’d been to a Julia Child cooking class. Taught by one of my favorite teachers, Phillis Carey. She was a particular fan of Julia’s, so it was no trouble for her to find recipes for a class. Phillis made coq au vin, chicken fricassee, the Roulade au Fromage, and Beef Bourguignon too. And this chocolate treat. Over the years I have made chocolate soufflé – maybe once. And I’ve made a chilled frothy gelatin kind of soufflé, but unless it’s baked like this one, it’s not a true soufflé. And although the instructions below seem long and tedious, it’s really not that hard. One of the great things about this recipe is that, except for baking them, you can make these ahead – yes, really – you keep them chilled until you’re ready to bake. They will keep overnight, but ideally make them earlier in the day and pop them in the oven about halfway through your dinner. Small ramekins take about 35 minutes. A larger single bowl of soufflé would take longer, probably 55 minutes or so. Whatever you do, once the top is puffed up (do NOT open the oven door to peek – you need to look through the door) don’t overbake it or it will be dry. Phillis told us that in France they generally bake soufflés at a 425 (a higher temp) for a shorter time period, because they prefer the center to still be soft and molten. This may be a change Julia made to this recipe – or Phillis did. Am not sure, but these are baked at 375 for 35 minutes.

What you see in the top-center is a small hole in the soufflé where Phillis piped in some freshly whipped cream, which oozes down into the soufflé. In France they serve a dessert soufflé (making a slot in the middle of the soufflé and spooning in something) with either a chocolate or vanilla sauce. In this one it’s just whipped cream, which I liked very much. Just remember that you must whisk these to your dinner guests immediately – within a minute or two – or the soufflé will begin to deflate, and you definitely don’t want THAT! Serve the ramekins on a plate with a small cocktail napkin underneath, to catch any drips and so the crock won’t slide around on the plate.
printer-friendly PDF

Chocolate Soufflé (Soufflé au Chocolat)

Recipe By: A Julia Child recipe, prepared at a cooking class by Phillis Carey, 10/09
Serving Size: 8
NOTES: The soufflés can be prepared ahead, then baked just before serving. Do serve them immediately, though. Don’t forget to sugar the dishe(es), as the souffle needs the texture in the dish to climb the sides, to puff correctly.

3 tablespoons instant coffee granules — OR
2 tablespoons instant espresso — OR use a small amount of very strong, real espresso in lieu of the boiling water
3 tablespoons boiling water
6 ounces semisweet chocolate — chopped
1/3 cup cornstarch
1 1/2 cups whole milk — (or a combo of milk and heavy cream to equal the approximate butterfat content of whole milk)
1/2 cup sugar
3 tablespoons soft butter
5 large eggs — separated
2 large egg whites
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
2 tablespoons sugar
2/3 cup heavy cream

1. Butter a 2-quart soufflé dish well and coat with granulated sugar or flour. Or use 6-8 small ramekins and utilize same process. If using a single soufflé dish you must make a collar around the top of the dish. Cut a piece of aluminum foil about 12″ wide and 1 1/2 inches longer than the circumference of the dish. Fold foil in half lengthwise, butter one side and surround dish with foil, butter side in. Secure with a straight pin, head down for easier removal.
2. Place water in the bottom of a double boiler or medium saucepan; bring to a boil and then remove from heat. In the top of the double boiler or in a stainless steel bowl place the coffee. Stir in the boiling water to dissolve the coffee; stir chocolate into coffee and set over hot water in pan off the heat. Stir briefly until chocolate starts to melt, then set aside and let rest for 5 minutes; stir until smooth.
3. Preheat oven to 375.
4. Place cornstarch in a medium saucepan; add a few tablespoons of the milk and whisk to blend completely. Whisk in the remaining milk and the 1/2 cup sugar. Stir over medium heat until sauce comes to a boil and thickens. Boil, stirring constantly, for 30 seconds. Scrape sauce off sides of pan with rubber spatula; spread softened butter over the top of the custard and set aside.
5. When ready to continue, scrape custard into a large bowl and whisk in the melted chocolate. Whisk in egg yolks.
6. Whip all seven egg whites with cream of tartar and salt until egg whites form soft peaks. Sprinkle on the 2 T. sugar and beat until egg whites form stiff peaks.
7. Fold 1/4 of the whipped egg whites into the chocolate mixture. Stir it to “lighten” the chocolate. Then add the remaining whites and fold gently, but thoroughly, until there are no more streaks of egg white. Carefully spoon the soufflé into the prepared dish(es). For the ramekins, fill them to just below the top of each small ramekin. You may refrigerate the soufflés at this point for several hours, or up to overnight.
8. Place the ramekins on a Silpat or foil lined sheet (in case there are any overflows) and bake, without opening the door, for 35 minutes (ramekins) or 45-55 minutes for the large soufflé dish, or until the soufflés puffed and set. Remove from oven, and remove foil collar (if using) and serve immediately with the heavy cream that has been whipped. Serve the ramekins on a plate, using a small napkin underneath each one.
Per Serving: 360 Calories; 21g Fat (51.0% calories from fat); 8g Protein; 38g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 174mg Cholesterol; 120mg Sodium.

A year ago: Filet Mignon with Mushrooms and Blue Cheese

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Get Recipes by Email, Free!

  1. Momstah

    said on December 26th, 2012:

    I made this recipe for Christmas and thought it turned out well. Two comments about step 6, which is confusing as written. First, the reference to salt – I omitted it as it was not listed in the ingredients. Also, calling for “all the egg whites” required a check against other recipes to clarify whether this meant the two separated egg whites (yes) or all five of them (no). Otherwise, good recipe and I will use it again!

    Thanks for the instructions enhancements. I’ll go fix that soon so it reads better. . . [later] I went to 3 other websites to compare the recipes for egg whites. I don’t own Julia’s “Mastering” cookbooks, so had to rely on online versions. All indicated you use all 7 egg whites, so I’ve changed the recipe to say “seven.” The omission of salt in the recipe must have been my oversight – it IS in the original recipes I found online, so I added it into mine as well. I hope you try it again with all 7 egg whites – it should make a huge difference! . . . carolyn t

Leave Your Comment