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me_in_paris_198That’s me, on a trip,  sitting in a Paris restaurant.
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You may have heard about this woman, Marina Chapman . . . she was kidnapped at about age 4 in Columbia. She was eventually discarded in the jungle. This, just a few days after her capture. No humans. No help. She learned to survive in the jungle and was taken in by a large Capuchin monkey family. She had no language, much, except sounds she learned amongst the monkeys. She lived for some years in the jungle, all alone. Eventually she saw some humans and followed them, was made a slave. Terribly treated, nearly starved, and was being primed as a prostitute, but she escaped that too. Her story is harrowing, and yet uplifting. She did escape eventually, in her mid-teens and grew up from there with a kind, loving family in Bogota. Her adult daughter helped her to write the stories – most of which she wanted to forget. The book is The Girl With No Name: The Incredible Story of a Child Raised by Monkeys by Marina Chapman and Lynne Barrett-Lee. National Geographic highlighted her story awhile back, and she appeared on some morning TV shows when the book came out in 2014. The author is writing a sequel, about Chapman’s life after she was rescued. I’ll be watching for that as this book leaves you hanging – only knowing that she was rescued and went to Bogota.

Just finished reading a very unusual book, certainly not on everyone’s radar – Once an Arafat Man: The True Story of How a PLO Sniper Found a New Life by Tass Saada. It’s about an angry young Palestinian. He felt wronged; he felt despised; his father didn’t understand him. He escaped his family’s plan for his life and became a PLO sniper. He killed many people. He killed Israelis and was elated. He was sent to the United States and big plans were in store for him, he thought. And then he discovered a new life as a Christian. It didn’t happen overnight, and he had many questions along the way. His family disowned him, yet he persevered. He met an American woman, married her, and had children. And he became an activist for change. It’s a fascinating story. He now speaks around the world, for peace and understanding about the Palestinian problem(s). It’s quite a book, and I’m glad I read it.

A publisher contacted me recently and asked if I’d like a copy of a new book called Book Cover Designs by Matthew Goodman. This might not be a book up everyone’s alley, but it certainly was mine. Since my career was in advertising, and graphic design, fonts and writing play important parts in that biz, I was very interested in reading the dozens of brief stories of many of today’s top book cover designers. It’s all about how they create and develop book covers that sell, or that give a tiny glimpse into the content of a book. This was as much about non-fiction books as fictional ones, and as you might expect, the designers obviously read or certainly heavily scan every book to find its core, and they go from there with the use of color, graphic art, photographs, and FONTS. I was interested in the use of fonts (I love different type fonts and am very limited here on my blog, unfortunately) and how they decided to use a specific one or more than one. Each chapter, about a specific designer, has a photo of the person, a brief background and then from their own words, how they come about the design of a cover. Then there are anywhere from 8-12 or so examples from that designer. VERY interesting book. If you have someone who has a design interest, is in the book biz, or graphic design, any of those, this would make a nice gift, I think. I really enjoyed reading all the stories and then examining each cover design they included.

Just finished reading a very unusual book, A Man Called Ove: A Novel by Frederich Bachman. Simply put, it’s a story about a curmudgeon. In fact, I think that word is used in one of the first sentences of the book. Ove, is a newly retired (unwillingly) Swedish man in his late 50s. He’s a stickler for the rules, things being “just so,” and most likely is a fictional example of OCD and the proverbial glass is half empty version of life. But OCD is never mentioned in the book. It takes awhile to figure out the story about his beloved wife, but it’s about his frustration in life in general, and about the relationships (or not) with his neighbors. It’s SUCH a sweet story if you can get over poor Ove and his over-the-top reactions to just about everything. I haven’t laughed out loud reading a book in a long time, but I did with this one. If you read it, don’t get discouraged in the early part – keep reading. When we discussed this at my book club, we re-lived some of the outrageously funny scenes from the book, and laughed again. And again.

 

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Brunch, on November 3rd, 2009.

Roulade cheese_1

This was SO good. And it looked like more work than I’d ordinarily want to do. I didn’t make this myself, but it was served to me at a recent cooking class. A class with nothing but Julia Child recipes. Phillis Carey taught the class, and made only a couple of tiny changes to Julia’s recipes, but this was just delish. It’s ideal for a sit-down lunch, if you do such things, or probably a brunch would be perfect. Could be done for a dinner, but it’s rich and filling, so you wouldn’t want anything else very substantial in addition to this. My friend Cherrie and I talked about doing it for a brunch, but it would be best if somebody else could/would help you with some of the work. Either with the soufflé, or with the other parts of the meal, like the fruit plate you might want to have, or the champagne cocktails. How’s that sound?

So what’s a fallen soufflé? Nothing but a soufflé that’s allowed to fall, which it will do all by itself if you just leave it alone. You do do the whipped egg whites folded into your egg mixture, it’s baked flat on a large baking sheet, turned out of the pan onto a flat surface. In that short time, the soufflé falls some – not so flat as scrambled egg-like, but it’s not as high as it is when it first exits the oven. Once briefly cooled, it’s stuffed with a Béchamel-rich spinach sauce (a Béchamel sauce is really just a cream sauce) and rolled. Then cut and served immediately, while it’s hot. In the photo above, there is an egg part underneath the spinach, it’s just that there was so much spinach it kind of rolled out the side. Notice how nice and fluffy the egg layer is.

If the meal didn’t require too much other work (like maybe a green salad and bread) this could be accomplished easily enough. The spinach and sauce can both be made ahead of time and reheated. It’s the soufflé part that can’t be even mixed ahead. Eggs are temperamental things – once they’re puffed up with air, they need to be cooked right away. Everything could be mis en place (ingredients put together on a tray, all ready). The baking sheet, buttered, parchment papered and buttered, all the whisks, whips bowls and mixers ready.

The Béchamel sauce is thicker than usual – in order to hold together the filling. Half of it goes into the soufflé, and the other half is used for the spinach filling. So there’s really only one sauce to make. The filling is not all that difficult – it uses frozen spinach, and you buy the Black Forest ham and cube it up quite small. So this dish is really do-able as long as you plan the menu accordingly.
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Cheese Souffle Roll with Spinach & Ham

Recipe By: A Julia Child recipe, from one of her cookbooks
Serving Size: 5
NOTES: Separate the eggs when they’re cold – they separate more easily. Adding the cheese at the very end of the preparation means the cheese doesn’t completely dissipate throughout, so you still will see and taste the cheese.

THICK BÉCHAMEL SAUCE:
1/2 cup unsalted butter
2/3 cup flour
3 cups whole milk — heated
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 pinch freshly ground black pepper
1 pinch freshly ground nutmeg
SOUFFLE:
1/2 of the above Béchamel Sauce
6 large eggs
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup Gruyere cheese — grated [or Emmentaler]
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs — coarsely crushed [divided use]
SPINACH FILLING:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 tablespoons shallots — minced
20 ounces frozen spinach — chopped, thawed, squeezed dry
1 1/2 cups Black Forest ham slices — cut in tiny cubes
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 of the Béchamel Sauce above
3 tablespoons milk — (approximate) to thin the sauce
1/4 cup Gruyere cheese — grated

1. BÉCHAMEL SAUCE: Melt butter in a 3-quart saucepan. Whisk in flour and cook over medium heat until bubbly, 1-2 minutes. Whisk in hot milk (must be hot milk) until smooth. Cook, whisking constantly, as the sauce returns to a boil. Sauce will be very thick. Beat in salt, pepper and nutmeg. Divide sauce in half.
2. SOUFFLE: Preheat oven to 425.
3. Butter a 12×17 inch jelly roll pan (with sides) and line with parchment paper, leaving a 2-inch overhang of paper at each end. Butter the parchment (yes, you must do this) and dust with flour. Melt 1 T. butter in a small skillet and add the bread crumbs. Toss over medium heat until toasted. Set aside to cool.
4. Place HALF the Béchamel in a bowl. Whisk in one egg yolk at a time (or you can temper the egg yolks with some of the hot Béchamel sauce).
5. Beat the egg whites until smooth peaks form. Ideally start the whites at a low speed, then increase as they become thicker. Don’t overbeat the whites – they should not be “dry.” When the eggs are still frothy add the cream of tartar and salt. Once stiff peaks form, fold about 1/4 of the egg whites into the Béchamel to lighten up the mixture. Add the remaining whites and gently fold and turn the bowl until there are no more streaks of egg white. Do not overmix. Gently fold in the cheese.
6. Pour souffle mixture into the prepared pan and smooth the top with an offset spatula, clear into the corners. Bake for 12-15 minutes (12 if using pure convection, 15 if conventional oven) or just until the souffle has puffed and top feels slightly springy.
7. SPINACH FILLING: While souffle bakes prepare the spinach filling. Melt butter in a medium skillet over medium heat and add the shallots. Cook for one minute. Stir in the tiny cubes of ham and toss for one minute. Stir in the spinach (squeezed VERY dry) and Béchamel, adding more milk if necessary to thin out the sauce. The mixture should be spreadable but not too thin. Stir in the cheese and taste for seasoning.
8. SOUFFLE: Remove souffle from oven and sprinkle top with half of the toasted breadcrumbs. Use a spatula all around the edge of the souffle so it’s not sticking to the edges anywhere. Lay a piece of parchment paper over the top of the souffle and carefully turn the pan over onto a bread board or countertop. Let rest 5 minutes, remove pan, then carefully peel off the paper.
9. Spread the hot spinach filling over the warm souffle, leaving a 1-inch border along one long side, the side farthest from you. Fold back the bottom parchment paper partially (about an inch), and roll up the souffle, using the parchment paper to help. As you do this have a hot serving plate/platter next to the far edge and gently roll the souffle onto the platter, making sure the open edge is on the bottom side. Sprinkle with the remaining toasted bread crumbs and serve immediately. Serving Ideas : Ideally serve this at a sit-down brunch, or a more formal luncheon. The souffle cannot be made ahead of time, but everything else can be. Would be nice served with a lightly dressed green salad and some bread.
Per Serving: 752 Calories; 53g Fat (63.3% calories from fat); 41g Protein; 29g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 429mg Cholesterol; 1213mg Sodium.

A year ago: Goat Cheese Potato Gratin

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  1. Toffeeapple

    said on November 3rd, 2009:

    Gosh, even though I’m not fond of cheese I’m pretty sure I’d like that; the textures look wonderful.

    The cheese is not all that prominent. There certainly IS some in there, but the spinach is what you taste, and the egg. . . carolyn t

  2. Ninette

    said on November 3rd, 2009:

    Looks delish!

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