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While I was on my 3-week trip to Europe, I read 5 books. Of them all, Sgt. Reckless: America’s War Horse by Robin Hutton, was by far the best story, a true story about an American Marine. Many books have been written about Sgt Reckless, this rather nondescript, small Mongolian mare that was purchased by American forces in Korea in the height of the war. She was reared as a race horse, but she spent her career as an heroic soldier for our military, saving countless lives as she willingly delivered munitions from one place to another. Everyone who came in contact with her loved her. She became a regular soldier, mostly so they could requisition food for her. Sometimes she survived on next to nothing to eat. She aimed to please, and please she did, as in one 24-hour period she ferried ammunition up steep slopes (too steep for soldiers to climb) and she did it all by herself. When the Marines unloaded her cargo, she immediately worked her way down for more. She knew what she was supposed to do. She was highly intelligent, amazing many people over the course of her life. If you love animal stories, you’ll love this one. Have a Kleenex box nearby.

When I load a book onto my Kindle, I don’t keep a note about where or how I heard about it. Did someone suggest it to me? Did I read about it on amazon’s site? I wish I kept track. Hence I don’t know why I ordered Born Under an Assumed Name: The Memoir of a Cold War Spy’s Daughter by Sara Taber. Probably the title intrigued me. And the book was interesting, I’ll give it that. Sara Taber grew up in places all over the world as her father, actually a spy, but commonly called a diplomat for the State Department, wherever he was stationed. Much of the book is about her inability to fit in. She was always the new girl in school, or the neighborhood. She was shy. Didn’t have a lot of self-confidence. She lived in Taiwan, Washington, D.C., The Hague, Malaysia (Borneo) and Tokyo. I probably missed a couple in there. She learned to love moving. She adored her father, and some of the story is about his career, though she only learns as a teenager what he really did for a living. Part of the book is her coming-of-age story, part angst about herself and yet she eventually finds success as a writer. And she is a very good writer – a kind of lyrical style. She repeats herself a bit too often and a few words were repetitive throughout. But overall, it was a very interesting read.

For years I used to read a travel column in the Los Angeles Times by Susan Spano. She wrote wonderful stories about her travels. I envied her life. One time she visited Paris for awhile, writing a series about eating and living in France. When that series ended, she didn’t want to come home. So she stayed. And she wrote for other publications. She’s written several books (one on divorce [hers] and another on divorce from the man’s point of view). This book, French Ghosts, Russian Nights, and American Outlaws: Souvenirs of a Professional Vagabond compiles some of her newspaper stories and she weaves in some new ones as well. She’s quite an outdoors woman – loves climbing mountains. I certainly admire that about her. One of the stories was so cute I read it aloud to my group of traveling buddies as we sat around in our Lyon, France flat having a glass of wine one evening. If you enjoy travel writing in general, you’ll enjoy reading this one.

Another really riveting story, one I could hardly put down, is The Headmaster’s Wager by Vincent Lam. My friend Joan recommended this one to me. Most likely  you’ve never read anything about Chinese immigrants living in South Vietnam during the war there, right? Neither had I. And you have to keep track of who is who, and the politics of the time. The Vietnamese don’t like Chinese people, so there’s that going on. The Chinese man runs an English school somewhere near Saigon. He has a right hand man who may or may not be what he appears to be. The Chinese man has a son who gets himself into trouble. Oh, webs woven every which way. As I said, I could hardly put it down. Will make a very good book club read.

And lastly, and probably my least favorite, but it certainly tops many charts for its pulp factor, The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty. The premise, a letter written by the husband, is found by the wife, supposedly to be opened after his death, but he isn’t dead, and she opens it anyway. Out springs Pandora’s box. It’s like Peyton Place on steroids. Oh my gosh. How much calamity can happen in a few pages. I wasn’t impressed, but it made for a good airplane read, I suppose.

IN THE POWDER ROOM: Our guest half-bath has a little tiny table with a pile of books that I change every now and then. They’re books that might pique someone’s interest even if for a very short read. The Art of Travel, a collection of essays about traveling (it’s not a how-to), gathering a variety of stories of some historic authors and where and why they traveled; The Greatest Stories Never Told; and Sara Midda’s South of France; also Forgotten Bookmarks: A Bookseller’s Collection of Odd Things Lost Between the Pages (just the cutest book – with a miscellany of things – letters, grocery lists, notes, reminders, confessions the author discovered hidden inside the books he purchased for his used bookstore).

 

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small engraved sterling silver tea spoons that I use to taste as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Cookies, on March 14th, 2009.

hazelnut-cc-cookies

A dear friend of mine is going through a tough patch right now with her health, and because of medication she’s taking, her appetite is about zilch, and the only thing that sounds good to eat, and that she nearly CAN eat, is chocolate chip cookies. With nuts. Soft chocolate chip cookies with nuts to be exact.

I’m faced with a dilemma – I prefer crispy cookies, so anytime my friend wants cookies, she has had to dunk them in coffee to make them palatable. I figured that needs to change. I CAN make cookies that are softer. And since I’m giving her ALL of the cookies (except for the one or two my DH and I ate just after baking them) I needn’t worry that my crispy-cookie-craving will be troubled! We still have cookies in the freezer from the last batch of my favorite One Bowl Thin & Buttery CC cookies from a couple of weeks ago.

These cookies came from a Rick Malgieri cookbook called Chocolate. But I read about them at Jennifer’s blog, Bake or Break. Hazelnuts are definitely on my radar, and with the addition of Frangelico (I used rum just because I didn’t have any Frangelico), a delish combo was made. Jennifer said that the cookies had a crispy edge, but were softer and mounded in the middle. Perfect.

Definitely easy to make, these came together in no time flat. I heated the cube and a half of butter in the microwave for about 15 seconds to get it to perfect soft mixing consistency. I forgot to toast the hazelnuts, but hey, they tasted just great anyway. I used dark rum (more flavor), and enjoyed the little zing it gave the batter. The rum is very, very subtle, so you needn’t worry that it will taste like alcohol.
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Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

Recipe: Nick Malgieri’s cookbook, Chocolate, via Bake or Break blog
Servings: 40

1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter — softened
1 cup light brown sugar
1 tablespoon dark rum — or Frangelico
1 whole egg
1 whole egg yolk
1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup hazelnuts — toasted, coarsely chopped
2 cups semisweet chocolate chips

1. Preheat oven to 375.
2. Beat the softened butter and brown sugar, then add and beat in the rum or Frangelico, egg and egg yolk.
3. Mix together the flour, baking soda and salt and stir into the butter and sugar mixture. Blend in hazelnuts and chocolate chips.
4. Drop batter (about a tablespoon each) onto a Silpat or parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for 12 minutes (or up to 15, depending on your oven). Cool completely on baking pan (about 5 minutes), then remove and continue baking.
Per Serving: 130 Calories; 8g Fat (56.0% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 13g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 20mg Cholesterol; 63mg Sodium.

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