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Just finished reading The Girl Who Wrote in Silk by Kelli Estes. What a WONDERFUL book. It opens up a shameful part of America’s past, but one you might not have heard about before this. In the late 1800s thousands of Chinese workers were brought to the West Coast to help with a variety of construction projects and a myriad of other things where laborers were needed. Many settled, married and made a new life for themselves. But suddenly the white population didn’t want them here anymore and they summarily ordered them ALL out of our country. This book chronicles a young Chinese girl, who was on a ship that was supposed to take her family to China, but the ship’s captain decided en route to dump them all overboard, to drown. The girl’s father knew it was going to happen and in order to save her, he threw his daughter off the ship as they were passing Orcas Island (in the San Juan Islands west of Seattle). She was saved. The book switches from that time to current time as a woman is rebuilding her family’s home on Orcas and finds a beautifully embroidered silk Chinese robe sleeve hidden under a stair step. The book is about that sordid past and the young girl’s descendents, and about the woman who is rebuilding. Stunner of a novel. Good for a book club read, I think. It has a reader’s guide at the back with good questions for book groups.

How It All Began: A Novelby Penelope Lively. I find it hard to describe this book – it’s wonderful. I loved it. But describing it is perplexing. The title relates to one of the characters, a woman of a certain age, who is mugged, and has to go live with her daughter and son in law for awhile since she’s stuck with crutches and has mobility problems. That starts the cavalcade of events that spread around her, with the characters. And she knows nothing whatsoever about them, hardly. They’re all somewhat inter-related (not much family, but mostly by circumstance) and they all get into some rather logical and some peculiar relationships. You engage  with each and every one of them; at least I sure did; and was trying to tell some of them to back away from what they were about to do. Or “be careful;” or “don’t go there.” That kind of thing. There is nothing insidious, no mystery involved – it’s all about these people and what happens to them. I was sad when the book was finished. The author, Lively, does add a chapter at the end – I wonder if it wasn’t part of the master plan – that kind of tidies up everything, and you get to see all of the characters move on with their lives, happy or not, but mostly happy. Really enjoyed the book. Am not sure it would be a good book club read, as the only thing to discuss are the characters themselves. Lively paints these characters well; you can just picture them as they get themselves in and out of relationship mischief.

The Last Midwife: A Novel by Sandra Dallas. It’s a very, very good read. It tells the story of an older married woman who lives in a small mining town in the Colorado rockies (this is the mid-1800’s), and is well known by all because she’s the only midwife in the area. Often people can’t pay her anything, or very little for her days of service with little or no rest or food. Suddenly, a couple accuse her of strangling their infant (she arrived after the birth, actually). Hence the story is about how this small town rallies or rails for or against Gracy. She didn’t commit the crime, but not everyone can be convinced since the father is a wealthy man in the area who carries a lot of clout. There’s plenty of relationship issues here, which make really great fodder for a novel. And there are plenty of characters in the book that you’ll love or hate. Some secrets get dredged up too. Oh, such a good read.

On my recent road trip, I visited one of my local libraries and borrowed 5 books on tape. We listened to 3 of them. I’m a big fan of Craig Johnson, the author of a series of mysteries taking place in Wyoming, and a TV series on Netflix called Longmire. This book, A Serpent’s Tooth: A Longmire Mystery was really complex. Hard to explain, but it’s about graft and greed and oil. Worth reading, for sure. Also read Stone Kiss by Faye Kellerman, another complex mystery about Lt Decker, an LA cop who journeys to NYC to help out his family when a murder occurs. Lots of violence in this one.  Not particularly a fav book, I’d venture. Then read Leaving Time: A Novel by Jodi Picoult. I’ve read most of her books – always very riveting. In this book, you’ll learn a whole lot about elephants since the protagonist in it is a young girl whose mother disappeared when she was quite young. Her parents ran an elephant sanctuary in New Hampshire. In the ensuing years, Jenna has tried to find clues as to her mother’s whereabouts because she just cannot believe her mother would have up and abandoned her. There are a whole cast of characters (her mother, her father, employees at the sanctuary, a cop or two, and a psychic). All play fairly prominent roles. Fascinating book – I really liked it, almost as much for the education about the behavior of elephants as about the mystery. A great read.

Also on the trip, I read a book (on Kindle) for one of my book clubs, The Swans of Fifth Avenue: A Novel by Melanie Benjamin. It’s about the relationship between Truman Capote and his “swans,” a group of middle-aged high society ladies, and specifically Beth Paley. I don’t know whether to recommend this book or not. Truman Capote was not a nice man, although the whole novel (vs. non-fiction, which this is not) is conjured from speculation about the years Truman was kind of adopted by the group of women. He cared about all of them (most were married/divorced, and wealthy) but in the end he betrays them all by writing a novella about their secrets, their marriages, their affairs (theirs or their spouses, information they’d all shared with him, thinking he could be trusted with their innermost secrets). It was scandalous, and yes, all that part is true. I finished the book, but almost felt like I’d read a “dirty book.” There is no graphic detail in this book – it’s just what Capote did to destroy these women, supposedly his dear, darling “swans.” He was the villain in the book, and in his old age . . . well, I won’t spoil the story if you’re interested in reading it.

 

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Uncategorized, on October 28th, 2017.

freezer_after_tenting

Did I happen to mention in the midst of my termite tenting that I have a lot of NUTS in my freezer. Oh gracious. Maybe I’m part squirrel, because I’ve got a pound or two or three of nearly every imaginable nut in existence.

I didn’t discard any of them, so am determined that I will not, I swear, buy any nuts for at least a year, unless I’ve run out. I use more walnuts and almonds than anything else, but I have plenty of those as well!

It may not mean much to many of you, but to look at my freezer now, pictured at left, it’s manageable. It’s not chock-a-block full. I actually have places where I can SEE the shelf. The white bin (bottom left) is full of nuts, as are 2 drawers down below. I had some soup the other day that I defrosted from 2015. Hmmm. It had a lot of freezer burn in it, so wasn’t one of my better ones. But just about everything else in there is worth keeping and I’m slowly winnowing away at the contents.

I had the flu last week (guess it could have been worse had I not had a flu shot) and I dug into the soups for 2 meals once I was able to keep food down. I ate nothing for the first 24 hours except Sprite and sparkling cider.

Also, ERRATA – if you copied or printed out the recipe for the Pan-Roasted Brined Pork Chops I posted early this week, there’s a typo in it. (Thanks to my reader/friend Donna who noticed the error.) The ingredient list calls for 2 cups apple cider – no, it’s 2 cups apple cider vinegar. I’ve corrected the recipe online, the pdf and the MasterCook file in case you want to re-enter it or download the corrected versions.

Sara_375AND, big news, my daughter Sara, has asked me if I’d like her to write some posts on my blog. I’m thrilled. There are umpteen recipes already here on my blog that are hers. She’s a very good cook, and she absolutely loves-loves to bake. Her two kids (Sabrina is the daughter who’s at Clemson University and young John is still at home, in high school still) are her greatest fans. Her husband (also John) is too, of course. She’s the best sports-team mom there is as she loves to bake goodies for all the kids. She brought two delicious items to a family get-together last weekend (a stunning cocktail with Prosecco in it, and a delicious, healthy appetizer) but she says she really wants to share HER recipe for chocolate chip cookies. She promises this weekend she’s going to spend some time writing up some things.

Posted in Uncategorized, on October 11th, 2017.

I’m thanking my lucky stars, and praising God that my home is intact. You may have read or seen clips on TV about the fires here in California. The Northern California fires have been far worse (homes, shopping centers and many people still missing and many lost) than our one here in Southern California, but devastating nonetheless. I was evacuated on Monday. They finally lifted it last night (Tuesday). I actually returned home late Monday night because I felt safe enough to return, although technically I was in a mandatory evacuation area. The road I used to get home wasn’t blocked off as many others were. I live south of that red blob above and as the fires spread, destroying homes and stables and outbuildings in an area called Orange Park Acres, they extended the evacuation zone, and I was in it. I grabbed a few things: 3 of my paintings, some valuables, my kitty, some clothes, my favorite pillow, medications, passport, cat food, litter box, kitty’s favorite blanket and went to stay with my daughter-in-law’s sister and her husband, who live about 15 miles away, south and west, far from the smoke and raging fire.

I stayed put at home yesterday, all day, watching news reports and refreshing the online fire map on my computer. If I’d left, I wouldn’t have been allowed back to my house. This fire spread so fast, they couldn’t update the maps fast enough. Dozens of my friends were evacuated also, and they’d spread far and wide to friends so they didn’t have to go to a shelter. High praise goes to all the firefighters who risked their lives to save homes. I think I heard that only 8 homes were totally destroyed, but hundreds are damaged and partially burned. The fire started up at the top right corner of that red zone (cause unknown at this point). It was a hot day, we had Santa Ana winds (high winds that blow in from the desert), the temperature was in the low 90’s, and the humidity was under 10% – prime conditions for a brush fire, perhaps from a thrown cigarette butt, since the origin was just beside a freeway, a main east/west artery in our region. The fire is still raging, but it’s going east, into the Cleveland National Forest, off to the right of that red blob. A favorite wilderness park was totally destroyed, along the eastern edge of the red blob. It’s a favorite for hikers and walkers. There is still residual smoke in the air

So, I lost more than a day in my quest to put away stuff from my termite tenting. I’m going to get on that today, I hope. But I’m feeling quite overwhelmed, actually with that task. And to make matters worse, my hot water heater that supplies hot water to my kitchen, has died. My plumber is going to install a small tankless one, but not until next week. Sigh. So I’m keeping my electric tea kettle going as I need to do dishes. Paper plates are the name of the game this week.

Thankfully, I’m fine, and my house is fine. My kitty still feels a bit discombobulated, though, as he’s “off” his food a bit and wants more attention than usual. But we’re alive and well, all things considered.

Posted in Uncategorized, on October 8th, 2017.

termite_bagging_food

So, the tenting for termites is done. My kitty and I stayed at a pet-friendly hotel for about 48 hours while the poisonous gas did its job killing all the mini-critters. Hopefully it also killed the ants that have been plaguing me all summer! My kitty, Angel (remember, he’s blind) was not happy in the temporary quarters. In fact, for 2 days he barely ate anything. He slunk around the rooms (living room and kitchen combo, bathroom and bedroom) trying to find places to hide. The last 4-5 hours before I left there he’d finally adjusted a little bit – he’d learned his way around all 3 rooms and knew where his litter box and water bowl were, although he still wouldn’t eat anything. The first night he woke me up innumerable times yowling. Fortunately, the 2nd night he had adjusted enough that he didn’t wake me up much.

Once they removed all the tents, I was able to get back into my house, close up all the doors and windows, then release the kitty from his cage. Then I turned on the A/C (it was about 90 yesterday).

termite_bagged_freezerWhen you do have to tent for termites, all foodstuffs have to be specially bagged (picture above and at left). They provided me with the heavy-duty, gas-impermeable bags, and anything that is edible must be double-bagged. I had a couple of cleaning ladies who helped me pack up the refrigerators and freezers. And my pantry, PART of the contents in the photo at top. Canned good and jarred things with a seal can be left out, as the gas can’t penetrate them, but everything else must be bagged. I have a big walk-in pantry. It was a must when I designed my kitchen 11 years ago, and I still love the little room, but it was absolutely jam-packed with stuff. Those 11 bags you see in the picture are only SOME of them – there are another 5 bags in my foyer.

Because the exterminating company was going to charge me $100 if I used another box of the bags, I decided at the last to move a lot of things into my car. A friend took my big box of chocolate I use for baking (about 20 pounds worth, I’d guess) and I unloaded about 30 plastic boxes and bins in my neighbor’s garage (boxes full of pasta, grains, herbs from Penzey’s, and bins for pastry flour, self-rising flour, oatmeal, cream of wheat, risotto rice, etc.). The remaining is in the back seat of my car. As I write this (Sunday), my car is still packed.

In the 2nd photo, that’s my kitchen freezer. Some shelves removed and all the contents piled into bags and stuffed back into the void. I haven’t even started on that yet. Last night I did get 3/4 of my kitchen refrigerator unpacked and replaced. Still 2 bags in there that are so darned heavy I don’t know if I can lift them out to unpack them.

My vow, when I start putting things away in my pantry, is to get rid of a lot of the stuff. Some things have been in there too long and need to be jettisoned. Probably the same thing for the freezer. I still have a freezer in the garage to do also and a refrigerator/freezer in the garage, all of them full. You’d think I was preparing for a plague.

One bag I discovered the ladies had put into my kitchen refrigerator was actually freezer contents, but fortunately, lots of it was nuts and they’re still sitting out on my counter, waiting for me to unpack the freezer so they can be put away. There were only a few pounds of ground beef, ground Italian sausage and 2 servings of Mexican Lasagna that I can’t re-freeze. I’ll need to use (cook and eat) those things in the next few days.

It’ll still be days until I can get back to normal, but I thought all of you cooks out there would laugh at me if you could see my stash of food. Pray you don’t ever have to do this! Usually houses are empty when they tent, but the termites were doing a lot of bad stuff to my inaccessible attics. My house has a mansard roof and although I do have 3 attics, they’re not big and the termites had found many other places to feed. When my general contractor walked my interior roof area, when I had my house re-roofed last year, he was the one who found all the termite damage that would be invisible to even a termite inspector.

Posted in Uncategorized, on October 2nd, 2017.

me_aviara

At the Park Hyatt Aviara Resort, in Carlsbad, CA. I’m squinting, because I’m looking toward a bank of windows facing the ocean.

This last weekend I stayed at the resort for 3+ days and nights to attend a conference held by Wycliffe Associates. They’re known the world over for Bible translation. In years past, translating the Holy Bible into somewhat obscure languages involved a missionary couple (usually) immersing themselves into the village of a remote tribe, then spending 10-20 YEARS learning their language well enough to then translate it and get it printed.

Now, there is an altogether new method – innovative for sure, called MAST (mobilizing assistance supporting translation) – created by a brilliant guy at Wycliffe Associates who designed a 2-week training which includes a small group of Wycliffe volunteers, a bucketload of Android computer tablets, then bringing together volunteer tribal people who are (usually) literate and they translate  some or all of the New Testament in that 2-week period and get it onto a tablet for anyone to read (or read out loud for those who are illiterate, but it’s in their home language). It’s amazing. Absolutely amazing. They’re also using the same technique for translating oral languages as well as beginning to work on sign language translation too.

You know me mostly for my cooking/writing/reading face, the things I share here on my blog. I don’t much talk about my churchgoing life, which is vitally important to me. I’m a Presbyterian and have been a member of my church for about 35 years. I’m active and involved in many things at my church. I’m not singing in the choir at the moment – after Dave died my heart wasn’t in it because it was something we did together. I co-lead a bible study group in my home, and I volunteer to help at memorial services whenever there is one held at our church, and I also volunteer in the Samaritan Care Center – calling people who are ill, grieving, house-bound or those who just need a word of encouragement.

Anyway, this conference was so very important, and I’m committed to helping Wycliffe Associates financially to accomplish their goals of translating the Bible into many – hundreds and hundreds – in the next year. By 2025 they hope to have translated the Bible into every known language in the world. There are many other bible translation organizations who are doing translations the old fashioned way. This is just a new method and light years faster!

More update – – – I’m having my home tented for termites. Oh, what a job it is, getting ready for that to be done! Everything in my house that’s consumable (except canned goods, jarred food, my wine cellar contents and other items with a sealed lid) have to be put into special bags. I do have to do everything in my 3 refrigerators and 2 freezers and my big walk-in pantry. Huge job. I just don’t think I’m going to be able to blog for a bit, which is why I thought I’d write this post, explaining why you probably won’t hear from me until late next week sometime.

After I returned from my driving trip last month, I came down with an intestinal bug (doctor said it was bacterial). I was really, really ill. For 7 days I was prostrate and was eating the BRAT diet (bananas, rice, applesauce and toast). While all that is fine, what’s not fine is that you’re not getting any protein, so I was really weak. It’s now been 2 weeks, and I’m back to normal (my doctor put me on an antibiotic which worked). But during that 7 days I didn’t do any blog writing, and still haven’t, sorry to say. I haven’t even begun working on my photos from the trip. But I will – – – it’ll just be a bit delayed. I think I have one more post in my “post bank” from a cooking class I took a couple of months ago. I’ll probably get that one up, then you’ll just have to be patient until I can re-group and get back on track. I’m feeling fine now, and thoroughly enjoyed all the good food at the Aviara, but I’m pressed for time working at bagging up stuff in my house.

So, we’ll talk . . . . .stay tuned.

Posted in Soups, Uncategorized, on September 6th, 2017.

chilled_yellow_squash_soup

Uh, huh! More chilled soups in my repertoire. This one using yellow squash and chicken broth. With so few ingredients I was amazed at how flavorful it was.

My new favorite thing – chilled soups from easily accessible summer produce. As I write this I’m still finishing up eating a batch of chilled zucchini soup (my second batch in recent weeks). In the interim I attended a kind of a cooking class (sans recipes, what’s up with that?) where they made a raw cucumber soup. I’m not quite so fond of that kind (raw) – I prefer the cooked one.

This soup, though, came from a class taught by Susan Vollmer, who used to own a cookware store here in my county, but she closed it down (mostly, she says, because Amazon cut into her business too much) and is retired. But occasionally she gives a class in her home. It was a very warm day, and Susan was in and out of her kitchen door many times tending the barbecue, but first she showed us how she made this soup and then gave all of us a bowl. I have all the ingredients in my refrigerator as I write this, to make a batch.

It’s a very simple recipe, and yet it has plenty of flavor. Perhaps it depends on what kind of chicken broth you use – the more flavorful – the better the soup. Yellow squash doesn’t have a ton a flavor (does zucchini have a little more flavor? I don’t know . . . just wondering) so you need the other ingredients (chives, chicken broth, sour cream) to have enough. I don’t mean to sound “down” on this soup – I actually liked it a lot, and I love yellow squash. Someone mentioned in the class – have you noticed that you no longer see the crookneck – apparently the growers have bred that aspect out of it – now you see both zucchini and yellow squash lined up like soldiers. Usually next to each other.

So, this soup – yellow squash and white onion cooked together in some olive oil, then the chicken broth is added and the mixture is cooked for a brief time – it doesn’t take squash long to cook anyway. Susan had made the soup ahead of time and had used her immersion blender to puree it. She prefers it just slightly chunky, so the immersion blender did a fine job of it. Then she added lemon juice (plus more later on when she tasted it), sour cream, salt and pepper. It was chilled down for several hours (OR, you can eat it hot) and served with a little dollop of sour cream and more bright green chives on top. I slicked the bowl clean.

What’s GOOD: the overall taste is lovely – good for summer, or good even in the winter, served hot. The toppings kind of make the dish, and the lemon juice is an important aspect of the flavor profile. Be sure to use enough. Keeps for about a week, too, and it should freeze just fine. For me, a 2-cup portion makes a really nice lunch (it’s very low in calorie, too).

What’s NOT: nothing that I can think of.

printer-friendly PDF and MasterCook 15/16 file (click link to open recipe)

* Exported from MasterCook *

Chilled Yellow Summer Squash Soup

Recipe By: From a cooking class with Susan Vollmer, 2017
Serving Size: 6

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 pounds yellow squash — grated
2 tablespoons chives — chopped
2 tablespoons white onion — minced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup sour cream — or full fat yogurt
1 tablespoon lemon juice — (may need more)
salt and pepper to taste
GARNISH:
1/4 cup sour cream — or full-fat yogurt
1 tablespoon chives — minced

NOTE: This soup may be served either chilled, or hot. If heating it, do not allow it to boil after you’ve added the sour cream, but keep it just below a simmer.
1. Heat oil in a large saucepan. Saute the squash and white onion for 3-5 minutes. Add broth, chives, then bring to a boil and simmer for about 5-10 minutes.
2. In two batches, puree the soup in a blender or preferably use an immersion blender in the pan itself.
3. Refrigerate soup until well chilled, at least 3 hours. If serving this hot, the soup will benefit from sitting a few hours in the refrigerator to blend the flavors, before reheating.
4. Whisk in the sour cream, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Taste for seasonings – add more lemon juice if needed. Ladle into small bowls and garnish with a dollop of sour cream and chives on top.
Per Serving: 118 Calories; 10g Fat (61.0% calories from fat); 7g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 13mg Cholesterol; 34mg Sodium.

Posted in Salads, Uncategorized, Veggies/sides, on July 28th, 2017.

pasta_abrazzese_salad

A pasta salad – served at room temp – with an unusual type of pasta, like little twigs. The salad is all about tomatoes.

It’s been about 6 weeks ago I went to a cooking class – I’m now attending a relatively new one for me, with a group of homemakers, offered in a home, and my friend Cherrie and I have been invited because the chef is our friend, and because the group has room to grow a little bit. Tarla Fallgatter is the chef, and we can always count on a really delicious meal to enjoy whenever she cooks.

This salad was really big on tomato flavor – it has what’s called a confit (kan-fee) added to it, which means a method of cooking food in fat, oil or a water syrup at a low temperature, usually cooked down to a soft pulp. Most commonly it refers to goose or duck, but in this case it’s about cooking and softening the sun-dried tomatoes and dried tomatoes both, in a flavorful mixture that coats the pasta well (see the orange/red color). What was unusual about this dish, though, was the pasta. Tarla passed around the bag of pasta – one of those more expensive, imported-from-Italy types.

The pasta shapes look a lot like pale twigs, and the only thing I’ll say is that it’s important to cook them to the right consistency. If you sample one of the tiny twig ENDS, it might be done, but the thicker center of the twig pasta will still be too firm. So test it by eating the center, thicker part. And when it’s done, the narrow ends are actually overcooked, but it can’t be helped.

The confit is easy enough to make – the two types of sun-dried tomatoes, shallot, basil, some spices, olive oil and red wine. You could easily make this ahead and set aside. Toast the pine nuts and set aside and cut up the little heirloom tomatoes to add in later.

Cook the pasta – you can use any kind of pasta you want, but Tarla thought this abrezzese was just so very fun (and different). Otherwise, orzo would be good with this too. Cook it, drain it, then add the tomato stuff, add the chopped tomatoes and pine nuts. Donabrazzeze_pastae. Taste for seasoning. Make this as a side dish for an outdoor dinner, or a potluck lunch. Whatever.

What’s GOOD: this has a different flavor – intense with the sun-dried tomatoes in it, but also because of the pasta shape. Delicious salad. Nothing extraordinary, but really good nonetheless. Easy to make – takes a bit of chopping here and there, but not hard.

What’s NOT: nothing at all. Don’t stress if you can’t find the abrezzese pasta – just use orzo.

printer-friendly PDF and MasterCook 15/16 file (click link to open file)

* Exported from MasterCook *

Pasta Abrazzese with Sun-Dried Tomato Confit

Recipe By: From a cooking class with Tarla Fallgatter, 2017
Serving Size: 6

2 cups cooked pasta — abrazzese or orzo
SUN-DRIED TOMATO CONFIT:
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 whole shallot — peeled, diced
1 teaspoon spice rub — Blackened, Cajun or your choice
1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, oil-packed — drained and julienned
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes
1/4 cup red wine
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 large basil leaves — julienned
1 cup tomatoes — heirloom, mini-sized, quartered or halved
1/3 cup pine nuts — toasted
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1. Heat olive oil in saute pan; add shallot and cook until translucent. Stir in spice rub. Reduce heat to low, then add oil-packed and regular sun-dried tomatoes plus the red wine. Simmer until wine is reduced by about half. Add balsamic vinegar and basil leaves off the heat.
2. Place hot, cooked pasta in a medium bowl and stir in the tomato mixture, then the fresh tomatoes and toasted pine nuts. Garnish with minced Italian parsley, if desired. Taste for seasonings. May need additional salt.
Per Serving: 169 Calories; 8g Fat (41.6% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 20g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 78mg Sodium.

Posted in Uncategorized, on May 2nd, 2017.

patio_wine_roses

What a lovely day and lovely event!

Months ago I signed up in my PEO chapter to host an event here at my home. A wine tasting (all wines contributed from my cellar) with food pairing. Two other gals agreed to co-host with me, and it was 2 days ago, on Sunday afternoon. What a nice time we had. Just wonderful food, and about 14 bottles of wine from my cellar. Each person paid $35 apiece (toward a charity within PEO) and the 3 of us coordinated the tasting of a bunch of lovely food. I worked hard at finding the right kind of combination of food to go with each of the wine courses.

As the folks were gathering on my patio, we served Trader Joe’s Secco Peach Bellini (pictured). It’s a very light sparkling wine with a bit of peach puree in it – it’s $4.99 at Trader Joe’s. We had some honey chevre out with crackers to go with that. We also had some delish hummus with pita bread too, although I don’t know that hummus necessarily goes well with peach Bellini, but one of my co-hostesses had a friend prepare the home made stuff and really wanted to bring it. It was very good and disappeared quickly enough.

Then we moved on to Chardonnay. Two different bottles were brought out from my cellar, and we had a cute Belgian Endive spear filled with a chicken salad with mango. Perfect with the dry, oaky chardonnay. (I don’t drink chardonnay, but I had two bottles in the cellar. There’s only one more bottle of chard in the cellar.) We also had some spinach turnovers to serve with the Chardonnay.

Next was sherry. I really enjoy Sherry, and hadn’t had any for years! It’s not much of a popular drink. I researched a bit about the bottles I had. Did you know that the dry, fino sherry should be consumed within 2 weeks, once opened? I sure didn’t. But then, I didn’t have any fino anyway. I had medium sherry, 3 different types, and we tried them all. Also had two dulce or sweet sherries too, which also got sampled along with almonds and Manchego cheese and crackers. I asked everyone to roll the wine on their tongues, then take a taste of the Manchego to taste the difference. Same thing with the almonds. Many of my guests were surprised they enjoyed sherry so much. The winner of the evening was Osborne Medium, in case you’re interested. I preferred Savory & James Amontillado (a medium). Most of the bottles I had on hand (all opened) were just fine – they tasted great, even though they’ve been there for years and years. Sweeter sherries have a stable shelf life even once opened. Except for one bottle, all the sherries were imported from Spain.

Next up was both Riesling and Gewürztraminer. I had a few bottles of each in the cellar, so chose the older vintages. Everyone was offered some of both wines to drink with some delicious pea, yogurt and lemon crostini (recipe will be up in a few weeks). I’d made that dish over Easter and felt it was a great success, so I asked one of my co-hostesses to make it. She did. It went really well with both wines.

Then we moved on to reds. My cellar has mostly red wine, so there was a big conundrum as to which ones to choose. I finally decided on pinot noir and cabernet. With the Pinot Noir we served a beautiful platter of home cold smoked salmon with crème fraiche, capers and fresh dill. I served Stephen Ross Pinot Noir (a really wonderful vintner in California). One was a 2004 and the other 2005. Both stellar bottles.

Next was Cabernet Sauvignon, a favorite of mine, though I think it needs to be drunk with food. I’d not ever sip a Cab before dinner – it’s too heavy and needs food to go with it. With that I grilled some sausages on my nearby grill (Polish sausage and some chicken Italian sausage). I cut them up into small bite-sized pieces and passed them, hot with toothpicks, as folks sipped the wine. And one of my co-hostesses had a friend prepare Tabbouleh, which was really great with the Cab. It was made the way it’s supposed to be – mostly parsley and very little cracked wheat. It was wonderful.

While all that wine and food settled, I went into the kitchen and started on the dessert. The recipe won’t be up here on my blog for awhile (June – I’m that far ahead with posts) but it’s a real winner and super-easy. It was a Raspberry Brown Sugar Gratin (find the recipe on Smitten Kitchen if you’re anxious to try it). I asked everyone to save a bit of the red wine in their glasses and we passed a platter of Humboldt Fog. That cheese is just to-die-for, in my opinion, and is such a winner to eat with a complex red wine. Most of my guests had never had Humboldt Fog, and I think everyone was a convert!

Then came the dessert – to serve with after-dinner wines. I had two half-bottles, one a French Sauternes, (a 2001 Chateau Lamothe), and I had a bottle of something called Chocolate Splash. It’s a red wine impregnated with chocolate. It’s very unusual – from Narrow Gate Vineyards, in case you’re interested. With THAT wine we served some milk and dark chocolate, just a bite for each person. The dessert was served with the Sauternes. Both winners – the dessert and that wine. I have about half a cup left of that in the bottle. I’ll enjoy it in coming days.

Lastly, I served coffee. It was a very warm evening and was surprised anyone wanted coffee, but several did! A lovely evening from beginning to end. I expected that some of the bottles I opened might have been “over the hill,” but every bottle was exceptionally good. I’m so glad. I certainly hope that my DH, Dave, happily in heaven, liked the fact that I contributed some of his wine collection to the event.

Posted in Uncategorized, on February 20th, 2017.

Once in awhile I read about what new words are added prior to the annual reprinting of the Merriam-Webster dictionary. Over at Food52, they provided the newest list, noting that some people don’t even know how to pronounce a few of them. The links go to the online dictionary where you can read all about it/them. EVOO – that’s a word that Rachel Ray coined, I’m sure. I use it now in my own recipes – so much easier than typing the full 4 words. For years, I’ve been mispronouncing #1.

1. acai

2. Alfredo sauce

3. American chop suey

4. arancini

5. artisanal

6. calamondin

7. chef’s knife

8. chicken mushroom

9. chicken of the woods

10. circus peanut

11. coconut milk

12. coconut water

13. d’Anjou

14. elderflower

15. EVOO

16. farro

17. flatbread

18. food secure

19. food insecure

20. food truck

21. immersion circulator

22. macaron

23. Minneola tangelo

24. noni

25. olericulture

26. red bliss

27. santoku

28. secret sauce

29. Shirley Temple

30. strata

Posted in Uncategorized, on January 20th, 2017.

No, this isn’t a repeat from yesterday – these are the best-est recipes I posted last year. Yesterday’s post was for 2015. Sorry if this is confusing. Altogether different recipes here. For 2016 I had a total of 8 recipes. In years past I’ve had more best-est recipes, but I used to post every 2-3 days then. These days I’m posting every 4-5 days. Here’s 2016 best-est recipes:

 

spinach_jicama_orange_salad_175

Spinach, Jicama, Red Onion and Orange Salad with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

 

 

 

 

 


pork_enchilada_casserole_serving_175

Pork Enchilada Verde Casserole

 

 

 


buttermilk_brined_pork_tender_cilantro_pesto_sauce_175

Chile-Buttermilk-Brined Pork Tenderloin

 

 

 

 


safari_seeded_cookies_175

Safari Seeded Cookies

 

 

 


blueberry_buckle_serving_175

Blueberry Buckle

 

 

 


apple_bread_crumb_pudding_175

Apple Bread Crumb Pudding

 

 

 


best_almond_cake_175

Best Almond Cake

 

 
   Cinnamon Chocolate Cake

 

Posted in Uncategorized, on January 19th, 2017.

Last January, apparently, I forgot to post a list of my best-of-the-best recipes from the previous year. So, I’m rectifying that now. Tomorrow you’ll see the best of 2016.

There were only 7 best-est recips in 2015. And here they are. Click on the link to go to the original post about the recipe.

cranberry_jalapeno_salsa_appetizer_175

Cranberry Salsa with Cream Cheese

 

 

 

zuni_cafe_roast_chicken_easy_175

Roast Chicken Salad (simplified Zuni Café recipe)

 

 


braised_lamb_shanks_carrots_175

Braised Lamb Shanks with Carrots

 

 

 

breadfarms_grahams_175Breadfarm’s Homemade Graham Crackers

 

 

 


berry_cobbler_sublime_175Sublime Berry Cobbler

 

 

 


no_bake_holiday_cookie_cubes_175

 No-Bake Holiday Cookie Cubes (Dorie Greenspan)

 

 

 


peach_blackberry_almond_crisp_175Peach & Blackberry Almond Crisp

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