Subscribe

Get updates sent to you for free by RSS, or by email:

Archives

Currently Reading

me_in_paris_198That’s me, on a trip,  sitting in a Paris restaurant.
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

You may have heard about this woman, Marina Chapman . . . she was kidnapped at about age 4 in Columbia. She was eventually discarded in the jungle. This, just a few days after her capture. No humans. No help. She learned to survive in the jungle and was taken in by a large Capuchin monkey family. She had no language, much, except sounds she learned amongst the monkeys. She lived for some years in the jungle, all alone. Eventually she saw some humans and followed them, was made a slave. Terribly treated, nearly starved, and was being primed as a prostitute, but she escaped that too. Her story is harrowing, and yet uplifting. She did escape eventually, in her mid-teens and grew up from there with a kind, loving family in Bogota. Her adult daughter helped her to write the stories – most of which she wanted to forget. The book is The Girl With No Name: The Incredible Story of a Child Raised by Monkeys by Marina Chapman and Lynne Barrett-Lee. National Geographic highlighted her story awhile back, and she appeared on some morning TV shows when the book came out in 2014. The author is writing a sequel, about Chapman’s life after she was rescued. I’ll be watching for that as this book leaves you hanging – only knowing that she was rescued and went to Bogota.

Just finished reading a very unusual book, certainly not on everyone’s radar – Once an Arafat Man: The True Story of How a PLO Sniper Found a New Life by Tass Saada. It’s about an angry young Palestinian. He felt wronged; he felt despised; his father didn’t understand him. He escaped his family’s plan for his life and became a PLO sniper. He killed many people. He killed Israelis and was elated. He was sent to the United States and big plans were in store for him, he thought. And then he discovered a new life as a Christian. It didn’t happen overnight, and he had many questions along the way. His family disowned him, yet he persevered. He met an American woman, married her, and had children. And he became an activist for change. It’s a fascinating story. He now speaks around the world, for peace and understanding about the Palestinian problem(s). It’s quite a book, and I’m glad I read it.

A publisher contacted me recently and asked if I’d like a copy of a new book called Book Cover Designs by Matthew Goodman. This might not be a book up everyone’s alley, but it certainly was mine. Since my career was in advertising, and graphic design, fonts and writing play important parts in that biz, I was very interested in reading the dozens of brief stories of many of today’s top book cover designers. It’s all about how they create and develop book covers that sell, or that give a tiny glimpse into the content of a book. This was as much about non-fiction books as fictional ones, and as you might expect, the designers obviously read or certainly heavily scan every book to find its core, and they go from there with the use of color, graphic art, photographs, and FONTS. I was interested in the use of fonts (I love different type fonts and am very limited here on my blog, unfortunately) and how they decided to use a specific one or more than one. Each chapter, about a specific designer, has a photo of the person, a brief background and then from their own words, how they come about the design of a cover. Then there are anywhere from 8-12 or so examples from that designer. VERY interesting book. If you have someone who has a design interest, is in the book biz, or graphic design, any of those, this would make a nice gift, I think. I really enjoyed reading all the stories and then examining each cover design they included.

Just finished reading a very unusual book, A Man Called Ove: A Novel by Frederich Bachman. Simply put, it’s a story about a curmudgeon. In fact, I think that word is used in one of the first sentences of the book. Ove, is a newly retired (unwillingly) Swedish man in his late 50s. He’s a stickler for the rules, things being “just so,” and most likely is a fictional example of OCD and the proverbial glass is half empty version of life. But OCD is never mentioned in the book. It takes awhile to figure out the story about his beloved wife, but it’s about his frustration in life in general, and about the relationships (or not) with his neighbors. It’s SUCH a sweet story if you can get over poor Ove and his over-the-top reactions to just about everything. I haven’t laughed out loud reading a book in a long time, but I did with this one. If you read it, don’t get discouraged in the early part – keep reading. When we discussed this at my book club, we re-lived some of the outrageously funny scenes from the book, and laughed again. And again.

 

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

Scroll down to the bottom to view my Blogroll

Posted in Chicken, Restaurants, on January 13th, 2008.

When my DH says this is a keeper, I listen up. He doesn’t say those words all that often. He enjoys my cooking and does tell me all the time how much he appreciates this dish or that. But those particular words just don’t come out of his mouth frequently. I heard them for this dish. He was intrigued enough by the appearance to ask me what was in it, how I cooked it. He keeps thinking that one of these days when he takes a several-day sailing trip on our boat, going out to Catalina, or one of the other islands within sailing distance of our shores, that he’s going to cook a nice dinner for his crew. (I’ve probably mentioned it before, but I don’t go on these jaunts because I get deathly seasick, or I’m so drugged up with Dramamine that I don’t function much, or suffer from very blurred vision if I use the scopalamine patch. All in all, I just don’t go. DH reminds me occasionally that he didn’t marry me for my sailing abilities. That’s for sure. He also didn’t marry me for my dancing style, either, but that’s another story.)

So anyway, he was curious about the chicken and nearly licked the plate. The recipe came from a restaurant out in our California desert – a French place called Cuistot. We’ve eaten there several times, and enjoyed the food. A reader wrote into the Los Angeles Times (December 12, 2007) asking them to get the recipe, which the chef provided. I believe the article said this is a common bistro kind of preparation. It’s easy – from start to finish it took me about 45 minutes, with 25 of those minutes the chicken was in the oven. You heat the oven to a phenomenal 500 degrees F. Yikes. But it works. If you have a heavy-duty skillet that can withstand that kind of heat, go for it (that’s what the recipe indicates). I wasn’t sure enough to subject my Look brand nonstick skillet to that temp, so after browning the chicken pieces I popped them in an ovenproof pan. Then I deglazed the browning skillet and made the sauce while the chicken was baking. It sped up the dinner process since I was able to take the chicken directly from the oven to the plate and spooned sauce on it immediately with a bit of the drippings from the blazing hot pan.

This is the kind of dinner you could throw together quickly – providing you have shallots on hand and fresh tomatoes. Most home kitchens would have the garlic, butter, red wine, vinegar and chicken broth. I forgot to add the garnish in my haste to get the plates on the table.

You see, I was late getting home – went to see Kite Runner at 3:55 and didn’t get out of the movie until 6:15. And, oh my goodness, was that a movie! I’d read the book a year or two ago, right after it came out. The photography was excellent – even though it was filmed mostly in China. The bulk of the real story takes place in Kabul, Afghanistan and Pakistan, but it certainly looked authentic. The story is heart-wrenching to say the very least about it. Highly recommended. And, of course, the book is better, but I thought the movie was exceptionally well done.

So, after a 30-minute drive home, it was late for dinner before I even started. Bang, clang, and I served it in a jiffy. And now this will go into the KEEPERS file. DH even asked that the next time this is on the menu, he’d like to make it. Now that makes this a real red-letter dinner! He’s never said that. Ever.
printer-friendly PDF

Sautéed Chicken with Red Wine Vinegar Sauce

Recipe: Cuistot Restaurant, Palm Desert, California, via the Los Angeles Times
Servings: 4
Cook’s Notes: I sliced the garlic (as usual, I didn’t read the recipe real well when I started – sheepish grin here), but discarded it after baking, since it was for flavor, not eating anyway. I also used chicken thighs and breasts, because that’s what I had on hand. Surely in my cache of vinegars I have cabernet vinegar, but in my haste I decided not to hunker down on the floor perusing for bottles behind bottles. And, I cooked the sauce longer than I should have – I kept reducing the liquid, but I’d already put in the tomatoes, so they weren’t just flash fried and still fresh-looking. Tasted great, though. We had the leftovers for dinner last night. DH again mentioned this chicken was “wow” in his book. We both agreed, though, that more sauce is needed, so next time I’ll double that part.
The chef recommends Cabernet vinegar for the red wine vinegar in the recipe.

4 pieces chicken breasts — skin-on chicken breasts or whole legs
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons butter — divided
4 whole garlic cloves — skin-on
2 tablespoons chopped shallots
3 tablespoons red wine
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 cup chicken broth
2 whole plum tomatoes — peeled, seeded and diced
Chopped chives or parsley for garnish

1. Heat the oven to 500 degrees. Sprinkle each piece of chicken lightly on each side with one-eighth teaspoon salt and a grind or two of pepper.
2. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large ovenproof skillet. Add the chicken, skin-side down, along with the garlic cloves. Sauté over medium-high heat, until the skin is golden brown, about 2 to 3 minutes. Turn the chicken and repeat on the other side.
3. Place the pan, with the chicken skin-side up, in the oven for 20 to 25 minutes until cooked through. The meat will be firm and the juices will run clear, and a thermometer inserted will read 165 degrees.
4. Remove the chicken from the skillet, cover and set aside in a warm place. Discard all but 1 tablespoon of the drippings from the pan, and return to the stove over medium heat. Add the shallots, cooking until they caramelize, about 2 minutes. Add the red wine and vinegar and cook until the liquid is reduced by half, a few minutes. Add the chicken broth and tomatoes and stir to combine; adjust seasoning. Whisk in the remaining tablespoon of butter, swirling to thicken the sauce.
5. Return the chicken to the sauce and heat 1 to 2 minutes until warmed through. Sprinkle with chives or parsley and serve immediately.
Per Serving (assuming you consume the chicken skin, which we did not): 583 Calories; 33g Fat (52.7% calories from fat); 62g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 201mg Cholesterol; 443mg Sodium.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Get Recipes by Email, Free!

  1. Anonymous

    said on January 15th, 2008:

    This the best recipe for Chicken I have ever cooked and tasted. I get my chicken from and this was a great way to cook what i got. I am always looking for cool new ways to cook my food, and this was really a change for the best!

  2. Carolyn T

    said on January 16th, 2008:

    So glad you enjoyed it. We sure did too, and it will become one of those go-to recipes when I’m in a hurry but still want something full of flavor.

Leave Your Comment