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On my recent trip, I managed to get in a lot of reading on my Kindle. On airplanes, waiting for airplanes, waiting for the bus to load, waiting in lobbies for everybody to show up to leave, and at night when I couldn’t sleep. A fun book was Mr. Mac and Me, by Esther Freud. It takes place in England in 1914. In a time and place where a 13-year old boy has a lot of freedom. Although the war is looming, this little village is relatively quiet and safe, as life used to be. Boys will be boys, and he enjoys sort-of spying on people, especially people he doesn’t know well. He imagines that a man who arrives in town to rent a house with his paints and easels, might be a spy. Thus begins a story that starts from that premise, but eventually takes you into a very special friendship that develops between the man, Mr. Mac, his wife, and this boy. The story is absolutely charming. War brings some brutal truths for everyone in the village, yet this friendship flourishes. Great book.

Occasionally I’ll latch onto a book about food or restaurants. This one, The Lost Recipe for Happiness by Barbara O’Neal, is a romance (not a sticky sweet one) about a youngish woman (and her dog) who take a big leap to Colorado when she’s offered a job as a chef. The restaurant is fraught with some issues, but the author weaves in a romance, her skills as a leader in the kitchen, throws in some recipes (that I have yet to extract from my Kindle pages, that I want to try) along with it, and you have a book that held my interest all the way through. Formulaic, I suppose, but it’s a cute story. Books about restaurants always divulge some new tangle of how a kitchen runs. I enjoyed the read.

If you haven’t already read it, you are missing a really good and insightful book, Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan by Bill O’Reilly. I was riveted from page one, all the way through to the end. O’Reilly has a very engaging way of re-telling history and making it ever-so readable and interesting. He weaves people’s stories, ones  you likely haven’t read or heard, into his narrative, to give you such a sense of place. You can just feel how these soldiers, pilots, prisoners and seamen made their mark, but likely all unsung heroes. It’s a must-read, it really is.

Having read some of Kent Haruf’s other books, I read Our Souls at Night. A lonely widow decides to invite a neighbor man, also a lonely widower, if he’d like to come to her home, at night, to spend the night. I simply can’t tell you anything else because it would give away the story. This isn’t a story about s-x, but about two lonely people who come together for friendship and companionship. It’s very sweet, not twee, but sweet. You really feel for both of these older people. Read it.

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Desserts, on December 24th, 2016.

apple_pie_cake_rum_sauce

Comfort food. Winter warmth. Rum. Whipped Cream. Nothing there NOT to like.

This recipe has been hanging around in my to-try file for awhile. It’s one that Marie posted on her blog, The English Kitchen. She has some really wonderful comfort food desserts on her blog, and this one is no exception. With 8 people coming for a bible study I whipped this up, made the simple rum sauce and whipped up some sweetened heavy cream. It barely served 8 – should have made a larger one, or two perhaps, but as it was, each person had a small portion, which was sufficient.

A simple cake batter is made (with a tad of hot water added in), then you add in all the chopped apples and spread that out into a greased pie plate. Use a large pie plate – 9” if you have one. It bakes for 45 minutes or so. It could be served warm or at room temp. The sauce is simple enough – butter, brown sugar, butter, heavy cream and some rum or rum flavoring. I used spiced rum. The sauce makes a lot more than you’ll need for the cake – I’d suggest you make half. I sent the sauce home with one of the families that came – it would be nice on ice cream or pudding.

apple_pie_cake_bakedThe pie cake came together very easily – you could make it without the sauce, but it was so good on it. No, you should make the sauce! And it takes very little time to make – heat the ingredients (without the rum), let it boil a couple of minutes without boiling over (watch it), then remove from heat and add the rum. Set aside to cool. Thanks, Marie, for a really delicious recipe.

What’s GOOD: it’s a nice, tasty, apple-y, sweet cake with lots of apples in it. It’s definitely a cake, just served in a pie shape. Loved the sauce (very sweet, however) and the dollop of whipped cream was a must in my book.

What’s NOT: not a thing – a nice treat.

printer-friendly PDF and MasterCook 15/16 file (click link to open recipe)

* Exported from MasterCook *

Apple Pie Cake with a Brown Sugar and Rum Sauce

Recipe By: The English Kitchen blog, 2012
Serving Size: 7

2 ounces butter — softened
1 cup sugar
1 large egg
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1 cup all purpose flour — sifted
2 tablespoons hot water
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 large Granny Smith apples — peeled, cored and chopped (about 3 cups)
SAUCE:
1/4 cup light brown sugar — packed
1/4 cup sugar
3 tablespoons butter — softened
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 tablespoon rum — or 1/2 tsp rum flavoring
Whipped Cream, sweetened, to serve on top

NOTES: I have reduced the sauce quantity by half – if you want some left over, double it.
1. Preheat the oven to 350*F. Butter and flour a 9 inch pie dish very well. Set aside.
2. Cream the butter until light and fluffy. Gradually beat in the sugar and the egg. Combine the flour, salt, cinnamon and grated nutmeg. Stir into the creamed mixture, along with the water and vanilla. Stir until smooth. Stir in the chopped apple. Spoon the batter into the prepared pie dish. Smooth the top and then bake in the preheated oven for 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean.
3. SAUCE: combine the two sugars, cream and butter in a small saucepan. Heat and stir over medium low heat until the butter is melted. Bring to the boil and allow to boil for one minute only. Remove from the heat, stir in the rum. Serve warm or at room temperature with the cake.
4. Cut the cake into wedges to serve. Top each wedge with some sauce and a dollop of whipped cream.
Per Serving: 397 Calories; 16g Fat (35.1% calories from fat); 3g Protein; 62g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 73mg Cholesterol; 287mg Sodium.

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  1. Toffeeapple

    said on December 24th, 2016:

    I shall take this opportunity to wish you a Happy Christmas and an exciting new year!

    Thank you, Toni. I appreciate your faithful reading here at my blog! Hope you had a lovely Christmas too, and that 2017 will be blessed and fun-filled. . . carolyn t

  2. Marie from Chester

    said on December 26th, 2016:

    So happy you enjoyed this Carolyn! That made my day. Thank you so much for the lovely Christmas card which we got from you. I must apologise as I did not get any cards out this year. Todd’s illness has knocked us for a loop. The hormone therapy and now radiation has knocked the stuffing out of both us with much to-ing and fro-ing to hospitals, etc. We will get on top of it however and remain very hopeful. I hope that you have a lovely and blessed Christmas filled with lots of love and pockets of joy, happiness and peace. God bless! xoxo

    Blessings to you and Todd as well. Take care of the Toddster . . . I know it takes a bit of doing. My Dave went through it – you WILL get through it, with God’s help. . . much love and hugs to you, Marie. . . carolyn t

  3. hddonna

    said on December 28th, 2016:

    It’s a bit late, but as there are twelve days of Christmas, let me add my wishes for a blessed Christmas, too. I’ve thought of you, but Christmas was chaos here, with all 6 grandchildren (aged 4 mo. to 8) and their parents and it was followed by several of us getting a 24-hour bug–at least it waited mostly until the festivities were over. Marie does have some lovely recipes on her site. I’ve got several favorites in my files from her. This looks like a winner, too.

    Thank you, Donna. That’s so sweet of you. Yes, I had a lovely, blessed Christmas with my family. Got home yesterday and now I’m trying to take down all the Christmas stuff and get back to normal! Sorry to hear you caught a bug – that was no fun since it must have traveled amongst you. Hope you’re better now. . . carolyn t

  4. hddonna

    said on December 29th, 2016:

    Yes, I’m better, thanks, as are the others who got it. Am still enjoying my Christmas tree during what Victor P. Hass called “that warm little hollow between Christmas and New Year’s.” (I believe he was quoting someone else, but don’t remember who it was.)
    By the way, I’m having my daughter and her husband for dinner on New Year’s Day, and we’re having those scallops with blood orange gastrique from your site. Have only ever made it for my husband and me, but I know they will love it!

    I’m starting to put away Christmas now. The trees are down (I have two artificial trees that are fully decorated and ribboned and lighted that are as easy as pie for me to put up). Those are put away, but now I’ve got to work on removing all my inside decorations. Maybe this afternoon I’ll get started on that. Glad you’re going to enjoy those scallops. Easy and so very tasty with the orange stuff with it. . . carolyn t

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