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On my recent trip, I managed to get in a lot of reading on my Kindle. On airplanes, waiting for airplanes, waiting for the bus to load, waiting in lobbies for everybody to show up to leave, and at night when I couldn’t sleep. A fun book was Mr. Mac and Me, by Esther Freud. It takes place in England in 1914. In a time and place where a 13-year old boy has a lot of freedom. Although the war is looming, this little village is relatively quiet and safe, as life used to be. Boys will be boys, and he enjoys sort-of spying on people, especially people he doesn’t know well. He imagines that a man who arrives in town to rent a house with his paints and easels, might be a spy. Thus begins a story that starts from that premise, but eventually takes you into a very special friendship that develops between the man, Mr. Mac, his wife, and this boy. The story is absolutely charming. War brings some brutal truths for everyone in the village, yet this friendship flourishes. Great book.

Occasionally I’ll latch onto a book about food or restaurants. This one, The Lost Recipe for Happiness by Barbara O’Neal, is a romance (not a sticky sweet one) about a youngish woman (and her dog) who take a big leap to Colorado when she’s offered a job as a chef. The restaurant is fraught with some issues, but the author weaves in a romance, her skills as a leader in the kitchen, throws in some recipes (that I have yet to extract from my Kindle pages, that I want to try) along with it, and you have a book that held my interest all the way through. Formulaic, I suppose, but it’s a cute story. Books about restaurants always divulge some new tangle of how a kitchen runs. I enjoyed the read.

If you haven’t already read it, you are missing a really good and insightful book, Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan by Bill O’Reilly. I was riveted from page one, all the way through to the end. O’Reilly has a very engaging way of re-telling history and making it ever-so readable and interesting. He weaves people’s stories, ones  you likely haven’t read or heard, into his narrative, to give you such a sense of place. You can just feel how these soldiers, pilots, prisoners and seamen made their mark, but likely all unsung heroes. It’s a must-read, it really is.

Having read some of Kent Haruf’s other books, I read Our Souls at Night. A lonely widow decides to invite a neighbor man, also a lonely widower, if he’d like to come to her home, at night, to spend the night. I simply can’t tell you anything else because it would give away the story. This isn’t a story about s-x, but about two lonely people who come together for friendship and companionship. It’s very sweet, not twee, but sweet. You really feel for both of these older people. Read it.

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Desserts, on August 12th, 2016.

kahlua_bundt

For some reason I’ve neglected to add this cake to my blog. Good heavens! I used to make it often when our kids were living at home. It’s made with a cake mix and doesn’t have all that much Kahlua in it, but it’s divinely delicious and decadent. It comes together in a flash.

When I was visiting with my daughter Sara, she decided to whip together this cake and said, “this is your cake; remember, we used to make it all the time.” Sure enough, we did. I think this cake was my old business partner Audre’s recipe. Probably she made it for one of our potluck lunches we had at the office once in awhile. Remember when cake mix bundt cakes were just “the thing?” Everybody was making them, with rum or bourbon, or other types of alcohol additions.

This one is made with a regular cake mix – remember back then, BEFORE the cake mix producers started adding the pudding mix into the cake. I suppose you could use that type in this, then just eliminate the instant pudding. But I like this one the way it is, so we chose not to use that type. It makes a very tender cake, and VERY chocolaty. Sara made this in a jiffy – in her stand mixer she added the box mix, instant pudding, eggs, oil, the Kahlua. Then you stir in the chocolate chips, and into the bundt cake pan it went. Once baked and cooled, I made a very thin drizzle to go on it as it looked a little bare on the pretty platter with nothing. Guess you could use powdered sugar too – easier.

kahlua_cake_cutSara ended up using the new Hershey brand dark chocolate pudding INSTANT mix. It worked just fine, and I’ll tell you, the chocolate flavor was intense. I think when I made it years ago I used a devil’s food cake or a German chocolate mix (one of those has a reddish tinge to the finished and baked cake) and regular Jell-O brand instant pudding. I never buy the regular Jell-O pudding anymore because I’m in love with the Hershey’s dark chocolate one.

If you look at that photo at left, you can hardly SEE the cake it’s so dark. I Photoshop’d it, to lighten it, so you could perhaps see some of the cake texture in the photograph.

What’s GOOD: everything about it. If you like chocolate, and Kahlua, well, you’ll love it all. Very intense chocolate flavor, especially if you use a dark chocolate cake mix and the Hershey’s dark chocolate instant pudding mix.

What’s NOT: nothing whatsoever. If you’re willing to eat boxed cake mixes, this one’s a winner; has been for generations of home cooks! This recipe probably exists in a thousand places on the internet already!

printer-friendly PDF and MasterCook 15/16 file (click link to open recipe)

* Exported from MasterCook *

Kahlua Bundt Cake

Recipe By: Recipe came from an old friend, dates to the 1970s or 80s
Serving Size: 18

15 ounces chocolate cake mix
4 ounces chocolate instant pudding and pie filling
2 eggs
1/2 cup Kahlua
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 cups sour cream — or yogurt unflavored (don’t use nonfat yogurt)
12 ounces chocolate chips

NOTES: DO use instant pudding, not anything else. If you use Hershey’s dark chocolate pudding and a dark chocolate cake mix, the cake will be really dark, almost black. You can also remove part of the chocolate chips and add in chopped walnuts instead.
1. Preheat oven to 350º.
2. Beat together all ingredients except chocolate chips. Add chocolate chips when batter is smooth. Pour into well greased and floured Bundt pan. Bake 40-50 minutes until a toothpick comes out clean, inserted about 1/2 inch from the center post of the bundt pan.
3. Cool about 10 minutes and turn out onto cake plate. Sprinkle with powdered sugar when cool. May also make a drizzle with powdered sugar and Kahlua, or simply milk and powdered sugar.
Per Serving: 329 Calories; 18g Fat (48.8% calories from fat); 4g Protein; 40g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 35mg Cholesterol; 309mg Sodium.

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  1. J.

    said on August 13th, 2016:

    Did you say you used a cake mix that did NOT have the pudding in it, or did you add the Hershey pudding mix to a cake mix that DID have pudding it? I’m not sure what you meant. Thanks. I’ve been enjoying your blog so much.

    Thanks for commenting . .. I used a mix that did NOT have the pudding in it. This recipe originates from a time before the cake mix manufacturers PUT pudding mix in the cake mix box. So, you can use either one – but if you use the mix with, then don’t put in the added pudding mix. I wanted to use the Hershey’s pudding mix, so I chose to use the old, regular cake mix type. Hope that clarifies . . . carolyn t

  2. J.

    said on August 13th, 2016:

    Thank you very much! Joan

  3. Toffeeapple

    said on August 14th, 2016:

    I had to look up Kahlua…

    No kidding? Gosh, Kahlua (ka-LOO-ah) is so common here. Made in Mexico. You can make a fake version of it with Vodka and coffee granules. It’s really good drizzled over vanilla ice cream. Lots of desserts here call for it. . . carolyn t

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