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On my recent trip, I managed to get in a lot of reading on my Kindle. On airplanes, waiting for airplanes, waiting for the bus to load, waiting in lobbies for everybody to show up to leave, and at night when I couldn’t sleep. A fun book was Mr. Mac and Me, by Esther Freud. It takes place in England in 1914. In a time and place where a 13-year old boy has a lot of freedom. Although the war is looming, this little village is relatively quiet and safe, as life used to be. Boys will be boys, and he enjoys sort-of spying on people, especially people he doesn’t know well. He imagines that a man who arrives in town to rent a house with his paints and easels, might be a spy. Thus begins a story that starts from that premise, but eventually takes you into a very special friendship that develops between the man, Mr. Mac, his wife, and this boy. The story is absolutely charming. War brings some brutal truths for everyone in the village, yet this friendship flourishes. Great book.

Occasionally I’ll latch onto a book about food or restaurants. This one, The Lost Recipe for Happiness by Barbara O’Neal, is a romance (not a sticky sweet one) about a youngish woman (and her dog) who take a big leap to Colorado when she’s offered a job as a chef. The restaurant is fraught with some issues, but the author weaves in a romance, her skills as a leader in the kitchen, throws in some recipes (that I have yet to extract from my Kindle pages, that I want to try) along with it, and you have a book that held my interest all the way through. Formulaic, I suppose, but it’s a cute story. Books about restaurants always divulge some new tangle of how a kitchen runs. I enjoyed the read.

If you haven’t already read it, you are missing a really good and insightful book, Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan by Bill O’Reilly. I was riveted from page one, all the way through to the end. O’Reilly has a very engaging way of re-telling history and making it ever-so readable and interesting. He weaves people’s stories, ones  you likely haven’t read or heard, into his narrative, to give you such a sense of place. You can just feel how these soldiers, pilots, prisoners and seamen made their mark, but likely all unsung heroes. It’s a must-read, it really is.

Having read some of Kent Haruf’s other books, I read Our Souls at Night. A lonely widow decides to invite a neighbor man, also a lonely widower, if he’d like to come to her home, at night, to spend the night. I simply can’t tell you anything else because it would give away the story. This isn’t a story about s-x, but about two lonely people who come together for friendship and companionship. It’s very sweet, not twee, but sweet. You really feel for both of these older people. Read it.

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Desserts, on March 25th, 2016.

best_almond_cake

A winner of a recipe. Should be, since it’s the culmination of kitchen magic by the chefs at America’s Test Kitchen. I’ve made almond cake before (there are two on my blog archives already) but no almond cake I’ve ever tasted has been so tender, and so full of almond flavor as this one. Does that get you interested?

Saying I’m a fan of America’s Test Kitchen is certainly a true statement. I don’t think there has ever been a recipe I’ve tried from their books or the TV show that hasn’t been wonderful.  It had been a week before that I watched the program for this cake and knew I’d be making it. I needed a dessert to serve to one of my bible study groups that was meeting here at my house. We happen to be studying Romans, Paul’s letter to the people of Rome, cautioning them about their behavior. Maybe if they’d had some of this cake, they might have listened better!

This cake was really very easy to make, although there are a few steps to it – it’s not a slap-dash kind of cake. You do have to toast the almonds and you make a couple of different bowls of things before it all comes together – but it all gets mixed in the food processor at the end, it’s poured into a greased (and parchment lined) round cake pan and it bakes. The topping (almonds, sugar and lemon zest) are added after pouring the batter into the pan and there’s nothing else to it. The cake has nearly 2 cups of almonds in it, so it’s not the cheapest cake to make these days, what with the cost of almonds rising by the day. The eggs (4 of them) certainly must help with the light texture – and you do whiz them up until they’re light before mixing up the rest of it.

best_almond_cake_sliceGetting the cake out of the pan was a bit of a challenge – I had buttered the pan (which was nonstick, by the way) AND used parchment, but it took a bit of doing to kind of un-stick the bottom corners from the pan – where the parchment met the sides – but it all came out beautifully once I gently pried all around the interior edges with my plastic spreader. It stayed together as I up-ended it onto my outstretched palm and arm and onto the cake plate it went (this, all when it was cooled).

They didn’t suggest serving it with anything, but I thought a bit of whipped cream with some almond extract in it was appropriate, and it certainly added to the intense almond flavor, but the cake, all by itself, is intensely almond-y already.

What’s GOOD: this will be the last almond cake recipe I’ll ever need to try. It’s THAT good. I loved the tender cake (texture) since many almond cakes are a bit on the firm side. Not this one – truly tender. And since I’m a big almond lover anyway, the amount of almond flavor (from the almonds themselves and from a little bit of almond extract added) it was just perfect. I highly recommend it. I also loved the addition of the whipped cream flavored with almond extract. Yummy.

What’s NOT: nothing other than the cost of almonds these days. This recipe is a keeper.

printer-friendly PDF and MasterCook 15/16 file (click link to open recipe

* Exported from MasterCook *

Best Almond Cake

Recipe By: Adapted slightly from America’s Test Kitchen, 2016
Serving Size: 8

CAKE:
1 1/2 cups sliced almonds — toasted (blanched if you have them)
3/4 cup all-purpose flour — (3 3/4 ounces)
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon baking soda
4 large eggs
1 1/4 cups sugar
1 tablespoon grated lemon zest — from about 2 lemons (save 1/2 tsp for the topping)
3/4 teaspoon almond extract
5 tablespoons unsalted butter — melted
1/3 cup vegetable oil
TOPPING:
1/3 cup sliced almonds — toasted (leave these sliced)
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest
ALMOND CREAM:
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons powdered sugar
1/2 teaspoon almond extract

NOTES: Even if you have a nonstick baking pan, do use the parchment, and do butter/grease the pan as well. Yes, really. I used all sliced almonds because that’s what I had on hand.
1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 300 degrees. Grease a 9-inch round cake pan and line with parchment paper. Pulse 1½ cups almonds, flour, salt, baking powder, and baking soda in food processor until almonds are finely ground, 5 to 10 pulses. Transfer almond mixture to a bowl.
2. Process eggs, 1 1/4 cups sugar, 1 tablespoon lemon zest, and almond extract in now-empty processor until very pale yellow, about 2 minutes. With processor running, add melted butter and oil in steady stream, until incorporated. Add almond mixture and pulse to combine, 4 to 5 pulses – or just enough to incorporate all the dry mixture. Transfer batter to prepared pan.
3. TOPPING: Using your fingers, combine 2 tablespoons sugar and 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest in small bowl until fragrant, 5 to 10 seconds. Sprinkle top of cake evenly with remaining 1/3 cup almonds followed by sugar-zest mixture.
4. Bake until center of cake is set and bounces back when gently pressed and toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, 55 to 65 minutes, rotating pan after 40 minutes. (I removed it when my instant read thermometer registered 198°F.) Let cake cool in pan on wire rack for 15 minutes. Run paring knife or plastic spreader around sides of pan. Invert cake onto greased wire rack, discard parchment, and reinvert cake onto second wire rack. Let cake cool, about 2 hours. Cut into wedges and serve. (Store cake in plastic wrap at room temperature for up to 3 days.)
5. ALMOND CREAM: Whip cream to soft peaks, then add sugar and almond extract and continue whipping until firm peaks form. Dollop each slice of cake with the almond cream.
Per Serving: 611 Calories; 42g Fat (59.7% calories from fat); 12g Protein; 52g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 146mg Cholesterol; 280mg Sodium.

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  1. bethier

    said on March 25th, 2016:

    Hi Carolyn–wow this definitely does look like a winner!! Beautiful– can’t wait to make it! I must
    confess the idea of the lemon with the almond surprises me a little–have not used that combo
    before in baking–but I’m sure it will be wonderful! You haven’t steered me wrong yet! 🙂
    Again, want to say how much I enjoy your blog. You do an amazing job and I love that it
    incorporates not just food, but books, travel and darn good writing! Thank you for sharing
    with us!

    Thank you so much. I assume your name is Bessie – my grandmother’s name. Thanks for your many compliments. I wonder some days why I continue with the blog, but it’s for comments like yours, today, that keep me writing. . . carolyn t

  2. Jean D

    said on March 28th, 2016:

    This sounds wonderful and definitely on my list to make! Thank you for your excellent description and tips.

    I’m glad I was able to draw a mental picture of a really good cake, and something that you want to try. . . carolyn t

  3. Madonna

    said on March 28th, 2016:

    I will be making this for my nephew’s birthday. Almond is his favorite flavor.

    I do love your blog. I love how you guide us through with extra comment of how to get a little more flavor or the pitfalls of getting that cake out of the pan even if the pan is nonstick. Those little extra tips make a big difference.

    Thanks.

    Thank you so much for your very kind comments. I do try to make it easy or easier anyway. I stuck the last couple of pieces of that almond cake in the freezer, so I have that to look forward to one of these days. Hope you enjoy it as I did. . . carolyn t

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