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On my recent trip, I managed to get in a lot of reading on my Kindle. On airplanes, waiting for airplanes, waiting for the bus to load, waiting in lobbies for everybody to show up to leave, and at night when I couldn’t sleep. A fun book was Mr. Mac and Me, by Esther Freud. It takes place in England in 1914. In a time and place where a 13-year old boy has a lot of freedom. Although the war is looming, this little village is relatively quiet and safe, as life used to be. Boys will be boys, and he enjoys sort-of spying on people, especially people he doesn’t know well. He imagines that a man who arrives in town to rent a house with his paints and easels, might be a spy. Thus begins a story that starts from that premise, but eventually takes you into a very special friendship that develops between the man, Mr. Mac, his wife, and this boy. The story is absolutely charming. War brings some brutal truths for everyone in the village, yet this friendship flourishes. Great book.

Occasionally I’ll latch onto a book about food or restaurants. This one, The Lost Recipe for Happiness by Barbara O’Neal, is a romance (not a sticky sweet one) about a youngish woman (and her dog) who take a big leap to Colorado when she’s offered a job as a chef. The restaurant is fraught with some issues, but the author weaves in a romance, her skills as a leader in the kitchen, throws in some recipes (that I have yet to extract from my Kindle pages, that I want to try) along with it, and you have a book that held my interest all the way through. Formulaic, I suppose, but it’s a cute story. Books about restaurants always divulge some new tangle of how a kitchen runs. I enjoyed the read.

If you haven’t already read it, you are missing a really good and insightful book, Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan by Bill O’Reilly. I was riveted from page one, all the way through to the end. O’Reilly has a very engaging way of re-telling history and making it ever-so readable and interesting. He weaves people’s stories, ones  you likely haven’t read or heard, into his narrative, to give you such a sense of place. You can just feel how these soldiers, pilots, prisoners and seamen made their mark, but likely all unsung heroes. It’s a must-read, it really is.

Having read some of Kent Haruf’s other books, I read Our Souls at Night. A lonely widow decides to invite a neighbor man, also a lonely widower, if he’d like to come to her home, at night, to spend the night. I simply can’t tell you anything else because it would give away the story. This isn’t a story about s-x, but about two lonely people who come together for friendship and companionship. It’s very sweet, not twee, but sweet. You really feel for both of these older people. Read it.

Tasting Spoons

My blog's namesake - small, old and some very dented engraved silver plated tea spoons that belonged to my mother-in-law, and I use them to taste my food as I'm cooking.

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Posted in Desserts, on June 13th, 2015.

berry_cobbler_sublime You know that phrase, OMGosh? Well, this is one of those. SO good. The biscuits, those lovely golden brown rounds you see there, are just beyond tender and tasty. Once you see what’s in them you’ll know why. And the berries? Well, I used mostly blackberries (fresh) and about 1/4  blueberries (also fresh). The only berry you can’t use for this is strawberries, just so you know.

About the only time I bake these days is when I know someone’s coming to visit, and that was the case here. I increased the recipe because I was expecting about 9 people, but then a few people couldn’t come at the last minute, so I had more than enough. I don’t know how well this will freeze – I have a smaller dish of this left over and will try freezing it. I’ll  put a paper towel on top of the biscuits (to absorb any of the ice crystals that form), then seal it with foil.

berry_cobbler_berriesBecause berries are certainly in season at the moment, I used mostly blackberries (so good) and a few blueberries.

There are two steps – one for the berries (tossed with sugar and a little bit of flour) and one for the biscuits (the usual, except that it uses heavy cream as the liquid/fat as well as butter).

The berries go into the baking dish and the biscuits are hand-formed (easy) and placed on top of the berries in about 1/2 inch thick rounds. It should go immediately into the oven so  the biscuits don’t have a chance to become sponges for any juices formed by the berries.

berry_cobbler_to_bakeInto a 375° oven it goes and bakes for about 35-40 minutes. That dish you see above is fairly big (it’s bigger than a regular pie pan/plate) and it took 40 minutes. The smaller one took exactly 35 minutes. The picture at right is the dish just before it went into the oven.

Originally this recipe came from Lindsey Shere’s cookbook, Chez Panisse Desserts, but I found the recipe, adapted somewhat she says, from Orangette blog. The only difference is the choice of berries. Molly Wizenberg used different ones, and as I mentioned, I used mostly blackberries with some blueberries. I’d guess that any combo of berries would work fine here. The recipe IS about the whole dish – the fruit and the biscuits – but I’ll just tell you, those biscuits on top are something else!

What’s GOOD: everything about this was scrumptious. I’ll definitely be going to this recipe if/when I ever make another berry cobbler. I don’t know if it would work with stone fruit – it might. My guests raved about it and so did I.

What’s NOT: nothing. As I said, it’s sublime.

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Files: MasterCook 5+ and MasterCook 14 (click on link to open recipe in MC)

* Exported from MasterCook *

Berry Cobbler

Recipe By: Adapted from Chez Panisse Desserts, by Lindsey R. Shere (recipe on Molly Wizenberg’s Orangette blog site)
Serving Size: 6

FRUIT:
4 1/2 cups berries — fresh or frozen [I used mostly fresh blackberries and some blueberries’
1/3 cup sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour — or up to 1 1/2 T.
COBBLER-BISCUIT DOUGH:
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3/8 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
2 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
6 tablespoons unsalted butter — cold
3/4 cup heavy cream
Heavy cream to pour over the top when serving, or vanilla ice cream

NOTES from Molly: This cobbler keeps well at room temperature for about two days. (refrigerating it changes the texture of the topping). Rewarm it gently, if you want, before serving. The original version of this recipe calls for boysenberries, blueberries, and raspberries. Molly made it with roughly 3 cups of blueberries and 1½ cups of raspberries, and she loves the flavor that results. The only berries that don’t work so nicely here are strawberries. The texture gets weird: spongy and slimy. If you’re using frozen berries, she recommends thawing them at least partially, or else they take a little longer to cook.
1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.
2. Toss the berries with the sugar and flour. Use the larger amount of flour if the berries are very juicy. Set aside.
3. In a medium bowl, combine the dry ingredients for the cobbler dough. Using your fingers or a pastry blender, cut in the butter until the mixture looks like coarse cornmeal. [I used my pastry blender for awhile, then used my fingers to break down the remaining little shards of butter.] Add the cream and mix lightly, until the dry ingredients are just moistened. [You can prepare the dry ingredients and butter up to a few days ahead, storing it in the refrigerator. The cream should not be added until you’re ready to bake.]
4. Put the berry mixture into a 1½-quart baking dish. With your hands, scoop up lumps of dough and form into rough patties, 2 to 2½ inches in diameter and about 1/2 inch thick. The dough may be a little sticky, so it helps to moisten my hands with a little water. Arrange the dough patties on top of the berries. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the topping is set and lightly browned and the berry juices bubble thickly around the edges of the dish.
5. Serve warm, with cream to pour over. This is best when still warm, but it’s also good at room temp. [Can also serve with vanilla ice cream.]
Per Serving: 412 Calories; 23g Fat (49.7% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 48g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 72mg Cholesterol; 331mg Sodium.

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  1. hddonna

    said on June 13th, 2015:

    Cream biscuits are amazing! I like to use them for strawberry shortcake, and am sure they would make a heavenly cobbler! The summer fruits are finally coming in–hooray!

    I was telling my daughter, today, about this recipe, raving about it. It really was a delicious dessert, and I want to make it again before berries are mostly gone. I loved the blackberry version. . . carolyn t

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